Dec 04, 2022  
2021-2022 College Catalog 
    
2021-2022 College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


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Course Description Key
 

Art

  
  •  

    ART 2220 - Painting II

    (3)
    A continuation of ART 2210 . Further exploration of shape and color relationships and more concentrated consideration of the organization and structure of the two-dimensional surface.

    Prerequisite: ART 2210 .
    (2 hrs lec, 4 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ART 2400 - Advanced Studio

    (3)
    This is a collaborative course in which art/design students undertake projects intended to give them practice in “real world” art experiences which may include: preparing exhibitions of personal and/or group work, volunteering for community projects, teaching after-school art programs, traveling, and studying contemporary art/design issues. 

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and successful completion of at least 30 credit hours.
    (2 hrs lec, 2-4 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ART 2410 - Ceramics I

    (3)
    Students acquire beginning skills in hand building, glazing, and firing processes in ceramic arts. Emphasis is placed on hand building construction methods: pinch, coil, slab, 3D design elements decorating techniques, firing styles, and examination of historical and contemporary ceramic sculpture. 

    (2 hrs lec, 4 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ART 2420 - Ceramics II

    (3)
    This course is an introductory class in wheel-thrown ceramics. Students will learn the fundamentals of throwing on the potter’s wheel and gain a broad understanding of the ceramics process. Exploration of 3-dimensional for

      Ceramics I  is not a prerequisite for this course.
  
  •  

    ART 2430 - Ceramics III

    (1-3)
    Studies development of ceramic form involving work in hand building and wheel techniques. Introduces surface treatment and glaze testing. Emphasizes design and conceptual development. Includes historical research.

    Prerequisite: ART 2410  or ART 2420 .
    (2 hrs lec, 4 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ART 2460 - Field Studies:

    (1-3)
    Students will have the opportunity for extensive travel, internationally or domestically, to explore the role of art in various cultures. Creativity and expressive use of sketchbooks will be stressed. On-campus portion of course focuses on art history,

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
    (.5 hr lec, 1 hr lab)
  
  •  

    ART 2465 - Art Portfolio

    (3)
    Students learn about portfolios: how to plan and design them; how to display art work by reproducing it both graphically and photographically; how to organize and physically assemble; and finally, how to use them as an integral portion of their resume for interview.

    Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor and successful completion of at least 30 credit hours.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ART 2750 - Magazine Design and Production

    (3)
    Students gain practical experience in editing and managing the concept, design, and production of a student literary and art magazine-reinforcing concepts and skills developed in earlier core and degree courses. Includes planning, decision-making, personnel management, and networking.


Astronomy

  
  •  

    ASTR 1002 - Observational Astronomy

    (1)
    A hands-on observational course for education and enjoyment. Students compare telescopes, learn how to use different telescopes, and learn where to point them in the sky. Some constellation identification done to build a repertory of interesting objects to observe. Opportunity for astrophotography available for those who are interested. Some discussion of the celestial objects observed.

    (1 hr lec, 1 hr lab)
  
  •  

    ASTR 1005 - Introduction to Astronomy

    (4)
    A description of the general principles, objects, recent developments, theories, and speculation in astronomy, as well as the methods and equipment by which astronomy is studied. Observations of the sun, moon, planets, stars, groups of stars, and deep-sky objects made, conditions permitting. Some computer simulations included.

    Prerequisite: Placement at math level 2.
    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ASTR 1050 - Survey of Astronomy

    (4)
    An algebra-based course in observational and laboratory astronomy. Topics covered include light, gravity, optical instruments, frame of reference, the sun, planets, satellites, comets, stars, groups of stars, and cosmology. Experiments include spectroscopy, comparison of optical instruments, Kepler’s Laws, and observations of as many different astronomical phenomena as possible, including planets, asteroids, comets, deep sky objects, and the sun in white and hydrogen-alpha light. No more than 4 hours credit can be earned in ASTR 1005 and ASTR 1050.

    Prerequisite: Placement at math level 3 or above.
    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)

Aviation

  
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    AVTN 1500 - Introduction to Aviation

    (2)
    This is designed for all students interested in career opportunities in Aviation Science and general knowledge of aviation and aerospace studies. This course includes historical events in aviation and aerospace development. Students will also study aviation and aerospace terminology, how airplanes fly, government and industry roles in the growth of aviation, and potential careers in aviation. Students will also be introduced to aviation law. The subject of aviation law will give students basic knowledge to understand the aviation legal system.

    (2 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    AVTN 2510 - Private Pilot Ground

    (4)
    This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts of becoming a private pilot. Students will learn about basic aerodynamic principles, Federal Aviation Regulations, aeromedical factors, and aviation human factors. Students will learn how to interpret and understand weather products, as well as understand basic weather concepts. Air Traffic Control and airspace operations will be discussed to ensure a thorough understanding. Students will also discuss aviation safety and how human factors influence the safety of aviation.

    (4 hrs lec)
  
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    AVTN 2511 - Private Pilot Helicopter Ground

    (5)
    This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts of becoming a Private Pilot. Students will learn about basic aerodynamic principles, Federal Aviation Regulations, aeromedical factors, and aviation human factors. Students will learn how to interpret and understand weather products, as well as understand basic weather concepts. Air Traffic Control and airspace operations will be discussed to ensure a thorough understanding. Students will also discuss aviation safety and how human factors influence the safety of aviation.

    (5 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    AVTN 2520 - Private Pilot Flight

    (4)
    Hands-on flight Instruction. This course provides approximately 50 hours of flight instruction (35 hours dual, 15 hours solo flight).  The student will obtain the knowledge, skill, and aeronautical experience necessary to meet the requirements for a private pilot certificate with an airplane category rating and a single engine land class rating.

    (1 hr lec, 6 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    AVTN 2525 - Private Pilot Helicopter Flight

    (5)
    The Private Pilot Flight course provides up to 67 hours of flight training. Students will learn to safely perform the duties of pilot in command in their piston driven Helicopter. They will obtain the knowledge, skill and aeronautical experience necessary to meet the requirements for a Private Pilot certificate with a Rotorcraft Category and a Helicopter class rating.

    (5 hrs lab)
  
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    AVTN 2600 - Instrument Pilot Ground

    (4)
    This course helps to instill the fundamentals of instrument flight. Students learn aircraft altitude control, flight maneuvers, and flight based solely on instrument reference. Students gain further knowledge of hazardous weather conditions, interpreting weather data, Federal Aviation Regulations, human and physiological factors applicable to instrument flight. IFR charges are introduced as well as how to communicate and operate within the Air Traffic Control airspace under instrument flight rules.

    (4 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    AVTN 2620 - Instrument Pilot Flight

    (4)
    Teaches the application of aircraft altitude control, flight maneuvers, and flight based solely on instrument reference. (Stage I-III). Students will do at least 35 hours of precision altitude flying which includes “actual” and “hood” time. The course also includes advance navigation, IFR/ATC procedures and night flying. 

    (1 hr lec, 6 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    AVTN 2705 - Commercial Pilot Ground - Part I

    (3)
    The commercial ground course is designed to introduce students to advanced aircraft systems, as well as promote a higher level of aeronautical decision making. This course includes advanced flight systems, airspace, cross country planning and navigation, advanced aerodynamics, and commercial maneuvers. Students discuss aircraft safety as well as research accidents and the causes. In addition, the student will gain a greater understanding of aviation physiology, aeronautical decision making and the Federal Aviation Regulation’s applicable to the commercial pilot certificate. This course consists of approximately 35 hours of ground instruction to fulfill the ground school requirements for the FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    AVTN 2707 - Commercial Pilot Helicopter Ground I

    (4)
    This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts of becoming a commercial pilot. Students will review basic aerodynamic principles, Federal Aviation Regulations, aeromedical factors, and aviation human factors. Students will review how to interpret and understand weather products, as well as understand basic weather concepts. Air Traffic Control and airspace operations will be discussed to ensure a thorough understanding. Students will also discuss aviation safety and how human factors influence the safety of aviation.

    Prerequisite: Completed FAA Private Pilot Written Exam.
    (4 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    AVTN 2708 - Commercial Pilot Helicopter Ground II

    (4)
    This course will review basic navigation including pilot age, dead reckoning, and radio navigation using VOR, ADF and advanced navigation equipment, such as GPS. Also a review of physiological factors affecting pilots and passengers. In addition, preflight planning for cross-country flights and the decision making process. All in preparation for the FAA Commercial Pilot Helicopter written test.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or completion of Commercial Pilot Helicopter Ground I course.
    (4cr hrs lec)
  
  •  

    AVTN 2709 - Certified Flight Instructor Helicopter Ground

    (3)
    In this course the student will be introduced to and become familiar with the fundamentals of instructing, as well as review and create lesson plans for all previously covered stages and material related to Private, Commercial and Certified Flight Instructor in a Helicopter.

    Prerequisite: Completed FAA Commercial Pilot Written Exam.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    AVTN 2710 - Commercial Pilot Ground - Part II

    (3)
    Students will develop the aeronautical knowledge required for the Commercial Pilot Certificate with Multi-Engine Land and instrument rating. Students will learn about multi-engine operations including multi-engine aerodynamics, performance, and limitations. The students will learn about the operation of aircraft systems and the functions of these systems. Other topics of study include regulations, meteorology, pilotage, dead reckoning, navigation aids, aeronautical decision making, high altitude operations, and commercial maneuvers. Students will research opportunities within the aviation industry that are aligned with their interest. A presentation will be prepared and delivered to peers concerning the research.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    AVTN 2720 - Commercial Pilot Flight I

    (3)
    Course includes approximately 60 hours of advanced flight instruction such as precision altitude flying, commercial maneuvers, radio navigation, and night flying. Students will receive an S/U grade after completion of a check flight halfway through the Jeppesen Commercial syllabus.

    Prerequisite: Private Pilot Certificate and completion of the FAA commercial written exam within the last two years or concurrent enrollment in  .
    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    AVTN 2721 - Commercial Pilot Helicopter Flight I

    (4)
    This course includes up to 60 hours of flight training and will build on the knowledge obtained during the training for the Private Pilot License. Upon completion of the Commercial Pilot Helicopter I course the student will be able to perform all Private Pilot maneuvers at a proficiency level which meets or exceeds the requirements for commercial pilot certification. The student will also have the proficiency to safely demonstrate consistent results in performing cross-country and night flying operations.

    Prerequisite: Must hold a Private Pilot Helicopter Certificate.
    (4 hrs lec/lab)
  
  •  

    AVTN 2730 - Commercial Pilot Flight II

    (3)
    This course includes advanced flight instruction in a multi-engine airplane. Students will learn to manipulate the airplane during commercial maneuvers and navigation. Emergency scenarios in the multi-engine aircraft will also be practiced and perfected during this course of training.

    Prerequisite: Private Pilot Certificate and completion of the FAA commercial written exam within the last two years or concurrent enrollment in  .
    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    AVTN 2731 - Commercial Pilot Helicopter Flight II

    (4)
    This course allows up to 60 hours of flight training. The student will build onto the skills learned in the previous stages and increase proficiency in cross-country and night flying operations. The student will perform many flights to increase skill in navigation and operating at unfamiliar airports. Through continued experience and training the student will be prepared for the Commercial Pilot Practical Test.

    Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in Commercial Pilot Helicopter Flight I.
    (4 hrs lec/lab)
  
  •  

    AVTN 2800 - Certified Flight Instructor Helicopter Flight

    (3)
    This course provides up to 27 hours of flight training. During this course the student will complete the FAA approved CFI Course with Choice Aviation. During Stage I the student will Master aircraft control from the instructor seat. During Stage II the student will learn to demonstrate maneuvers while simultaneously instructing.

    Prerequisite: Must hold a Commercial Helicopter Certificate or be concurrently enrolled in Commercial Helicopter Flight II.
    (3 hrs lab)

Biology

  
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    BIOL 1000 - Principles of Biology

    (4)
    Students learn principles that are important for achieving sound scientific reasoning and methodology. Students study the following topics: cell biology, physiology, genetics, evolution, ecology, and the interactions of humans with their environment. All topics are considered within the context of the human experience. This course will fulfill the lab science general education requirement for students not specializing in the biological or physical sciences or health and physical education. 

    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    BIOL 1002 - Integrated Sciences

    (4)
    An introduction to the concepts and methodologies of science, which integrates basic principles from the physical, geological, and biological sciences. The idea behind each of the concepts is also treated in its historical context, with special attention to its importance in understanding of the nature of the universe. The course is intended for non-science majors and uses little mathematics. 

    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    BIOL 1010 - General Biology I

    (4)
    Students study the following topics: ecology, evolution, genetics, the chemistry of life, cell structure and function, respiration, and photosynthesis. This introductory biology course is designed for students specializing in the biological or physical education.

    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    BIOL 1080 - Intro to Environmental Science

    (3)
    Intended to attract students interested in the environment. Concerns conservation of natural resources. Course focuses upon modern environmental problems.

    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    BIOL 1081 - Environmental Science Lab

    (1)
    An applied lab course illustrating techniques and approaches common to Environmental Science in which students actively participate in analyses of water soil, climate, and organisms generating assessments of environmental quality and function. Emphasis is placed on techniques used to sample and analyze patterns in biotic systems while assessing their interactions with humans. Class meetings will occur over 2 weekends.

    Prerequisite: Have taken or are concurrently taking BIOL 1080  .
    (1 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    BIOL 1101 - Biology First Year Seminar

    (2)
    This course is designed to assist students seeking biology and related science degrees. Students will develop skills such as research, planning, resume building and self-assessment that will aid in student success in college and their chosen career. The course provides an intellectual and social transition to the college in a small classroom environment. Students are encouraged to actively participate in their learning through critical inquiry, listening, and contributing to the class discussion.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    BIOL 2020 - General Biology II

    (4)
    This course examines the biological diversity of organisms classified within the major clades of Bacteria, Archaea, Protista, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia. The three-domain system is emphasized. Topics include the origins of life, taxonomy, evolution, comparative anatomy and physiology, behavior, ecology, and phylogenetics.

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in BIOL 1010 .
    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    BIOL 2023 - Plant and Fungal Biology

    (4)
    This introductory botany course is designed for students specializing in the biological or physical sciences or health sciences and is part of the three-semester General Biology sequence expected at some transfer institutions. Students study the following topics: plant anatomy, plant physiology, plant morphology, and a survey of the Kingdoms Fungi, and Plantae. Laboratory is required. 

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in BIOL 1010 .
    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    BIOL 2310 - Intro to Geographic Info Systems

    (4)
    Students acquire an introductory-level understanding of the principles and practices of geographic information systems (GIS), both as an interactive spatial database and as a powerful analytical tool. Students learn the theory of mapping and spatial data analysis as well as learn to use GIS software through exercises and projects.

    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    BIOL 2385 - Research/Life & Physical Sciences

    (3)
    Research in the Life and Physical Sciences offers students the opportunity to work with other students interested in science disciplines.  Students will develop individual projects within their discipline, and with fellow students, exchange ideas and develop an appreciation for the commonality between scientific disciplines and the role of science in society.  Students will be expected to make a public presentation of their work.

    Prerequisite:  Successful completion of at least 30 credit hours.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    BIOL 2395 - Biological Research

    (3)
    Students have the opportunity to design biological experiments and to organize, analyze, and interpret data. Students write a scientific paper and orally present their results to both peers and faculty. Capstone Course

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1010  and successful completion of at least 30 credit hours.
    (1 hr lec)
  
  •  

    BIOL 2400 - General Ecology

    (3)
    A study of ecosystems, energy flows, habitats, natural cycles, environmental influences, succession, population, and speciation.

    Prerequisite: Complete BIOL 1010  with a minimum grade “C”, and take one of the following courses with a minimum grade of “C”: BIOL 2020 , [[per
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    BIOL 2410 - Field Ecology

    (2)
    A lecture/applied lab course giving students the opportunity to investigate natural communities and actively participate in study and analysis of water, soil, climate, and organisms associated with characteristic habitats. Students also gain skills in experimental design, critical thinking, and scientific writing. The primary purpose of this course is to give the student practical experience in the methodologies of field investigation and laboratory techniques used in Ecology. Emphasis is placed on techniques used to sample and analyze patterns in both plant and animal studies as well as other communities. Students will also gain skills in experimental design, critical thinking, and scientific writing. Lecture and Field/Lab course. 

    Prequisite: BIOL 2400  or concurrent enrollment.
    (2 hrs lec/lab)
  
  •  

    BIOL 2460 - Field Studies:

    (4)


    Students will gain general and specific knowledge of current and historical scientific research in and around Yellowstone National Park with an opportunity to participate in and contribute to real raptor migration monitoring as a continuation of work initiated by the Yellowstone Center for Resources. With selected readings and lively discussions, students will gain a deep appreciation of the unique ecology, history, and scientific and national cultures associated with the nation’s 1st national park. Policy, management, and charting the course for the future of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem will be envisioned during twice-weekly field excursions to the Hayden Valley and Mount Washburn upon which students will observe, identify, and record autumnally migrating raptors.

     

    (LAL 4 credit)

  
  •  

    BIOL 2465 - Research Problems in Biology

    (1-3)
    Introduces various methodologies employed in biologic research. includes literature searches, data collection and analysis, and research report writing.

    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
    (2-6 hrs lab)

Business

  
  •  

    BUSN 2000 - Intro to International Business

    (3)
    A broad survey of the field of international business which introduces the basic concepts of international business activity and theory. Reviews major foreign environmental forces (financial, economic and socioeconomic, physical, sociocultural, political, legal, labor, competitive, and distributive) within the context of strategic management issues.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    DSCI 3210 - Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain Management

    (3)
    An introductory course in production and operations management. Typical topics include operations strategy, quality management, facilities location, facilities layout, forecasting, inventory management, production planning, scheduling and project management.

    Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in MATH 2350 or STAT 2050.
    (3 hrs lec)

Business Administration

  
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    BADM 1000 - Intro to Business

    (3)
    A general introduction to principal business activities and the functions of management in planning, operating, organizing, and controlling an enterprise.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    BADM 1005 - Business Mathematics

    (3)
    Course enables students to apply basic mathematic and problem-solving skills with selected business/ consumer situations encountered in business and personal lives. Major topics include areas of banking, marketing, retailing, taxes, finance, insurance, and basic statistics. This course fulfills math requirement only for the AAS degree.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 0900  or placement at math level 1 within one year prior to enrollment.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    BADM 1020 - Business Communication

    (3)
    Students apply the principles of effective written, oral, and digital communication in a business environment through writing in a number of professional genres (e.g., correspondence, proposals, and websites) and giving presentations. Emphasis is placed on audience analysis and clear writing in an increasingly global digital workplace. 

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010  with a “C-” or better.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    BADM 1101 - First Year Seminar for Business Majors

    (3)
    This is the official “Cornerstone” course for the Business discipline. It is an orientation class which introduces students to the business programs, business careers, business faculty, institutional resources, opportunities and the thrill of education.

  
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    BADM 2010 - Legal Environment of Business

    (3)
    Provides an overview of business-related legal topics including the legal environment of businesses, contracts, the Uniform Commercial Code, property rights, and social responsibility.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    BADM 2030 - Business Ethics

    (3)
    Students learn how business and society interact through the study of consumerism, technology, ethical and moral conviction. Introduces the concept of business ethics, an overview of major ethical issues that face business today, and discusses moral philosophy through an understanding of classical and contemporary ethical theories.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    BADM 2100 - Small Business Practices

    (3)
    Offers basic principles of marketing, production, operations, finance, accounting, and personnel required to operate any small business. Employs a problem-solving methodology within a case study orientation that integrates course material and requires students to apply knowledge to situational problems. 

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    BADM 2970 - Internship/Practicum: Business

    (1-3)
    Students use hands-on experience to enhance the formal class work and real experience in their choice of industry that may be small business management, retail sales, tourism, hospitality management, office management, etc. This course will be a supervised on-site experiential learning course.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 30 credit hours.
    (2 hrs lab per credit hour)

Business Management Information Systems

  
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    BMIS 2000 - Computer Information Systems

    (3)
    Introduction to computer and information systems. Course content includes study of hardware, software, computer architecture, information processing, data communications, information management, and social issues in computing. Incorporates application experiences in operating system, word processing, spreadsheet, and database software. 

    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)

Chemistry

  
  •  

    CHEM 1000 - Intro to Chemistry

    (4)
    Students will learn the principles of chemistry with some inorganic applications including atomic and molecular structures; periodic law; ionic theory; bonding; behavior of solid, liquid, and gaseous states of matter, stoichiometry, solutions, equilibrium, kinetics, and electrochemistry. Hands-on experiments to teach students some of the basic skills. 

    Prerequisite: Placement at Math Level 3 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 0930 - Intermediate Algebra  
    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    CHEM 1002 - Integrated Sciences

    (4)
    An introduction to the concepts and methodologies of science, which integrates basic principles from the physical, geological, and biological sciences. The idea behind each of the concepts is also treated in its historical context, with special attention to its importance in understanding of the nature of the universe. The course is intended for non-science majors and uses little mathematics. Credit cannot be earned in both BIOL 1002 and CHEM 1002. 

    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    CHEM 1020 - General Chemistry I

    (5)
    Principles and theories of Chemistry, designed for science and related concentrations. Students acquire knowledge of atomic and molecular structures; periodic law; ionic theory; behavior and properties of gaseous, liquid, and solid states of matter; plus some study of nonmetallic elements. 

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry preferred. Concurrent enrollment in MATH 1400  or above or equivalent math background, or completion of CHEM 1000 .
    (4 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    CHEM 1030 - General Chemistry II

    (4)
    Continues CHEM 1020. Students acquire knowledge of oxidation-reduction reactions, additional nonmetals, groups on the periodic chart, kinetics, equilibrium, PH, buffers, thermodynamics, solution preparation, radioactivity, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. 

    Prerequisite: Minimum grade of “C” in CHEM 1020.
    (3 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    CHEM 1090 - Fundamentals of Physical Universe

    (4)
    Applies fundamental principles of chemistry and physics to real life situations. Designed primarily for students specializing in elementary education. Equivalent to PHYS 1090 .

    Prerequisite: Placement at math level 3 within one year prior to enrollment.
    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    CHEM 2230 - Quantitative Analysis

    (4)
    Fundamental concepts of quantitative analysis, application, and techniques of gravimetric, volumetric, and instrumental analysis.

    Prerequisite: MATH 1400  or equivalent, CHEM 1000  or CHEM 1030 .
    (2 hrs lec, 6 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    CHEM 2300 - Intro to Organic Chemistry

    (4)
    Students learn basic principles and methods of organic Chemistry including nomenclature, structure, reactions, reaction mechanisms, and stereo chemistry. They also acquire introductory knowledge of nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, ultraviolet, and mass spectral analysis of organic compounds.

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1000  or CHEM 1020 . Not for students who have taken CHEM 2420  or CHEM 2440 .
    (4 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    CHEM 2420 - Organic Chemistry I

    (4)
    The first semester of a continuing course studying aliphatic compounds of carbon. Includes nomenclature, structure, preparation, reactions, reaction mechanisms, and stereo chemistry. Introduces nuclear magnetic resonance, ultraviolet, infrared, and mass spectral analysis of organic compounds.

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1030  or equivalent.
    (3 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    CHEM 2440 - Organic Chemistry II

    (4)
    Aromatic compounds stressed. Emphasizes functional groups of compounds covered first semester along with others. Covers fats, carbohydrates, and proteins in the latter part of course as background for biochemistry.

    Prerequisite: CHEM 2420 .
    (3 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    CHEM 2485 - Chemistry Capstone Seminar

    (1)
    Students design and implement an independent laboratory project involving either chemical synthase or chemical analysis. Students are evaluated on their ability to organize their laboratory notebook, integrate scientific literature into their project, provide a thirty- minute project-based presentation before the Physical Science Division faculty and respond to questions about their work. 

    Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 2440  and successful completion of at least 30 credit hours.
    (.5 hr lec, 1 hr lab)

Communication and Mass Media

  
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    COMM 1025 - Communication for Health Care Professionals

    (2)
    Focuses on interactions of people involved in the health care process, and the dissemination and interpretation of health-related messages. Explores the communication demands of health care. Examines communication issues and problems in modern health care systems. Emphasis is on provided-recipient communication, communication in health concerns, and application strategies for the implementation of effective communication. 

    (2 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    COMM 1030 - Interpersonal Communication

    (3)
    Students learn to communicate on a person-to-person and small group level. Considers verbal and nonverbal areas, with instruction designed to provide insight into improving communication with others through discovery and relevant theory.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    COMM 1040 - Introduction to Communication Theory

    (3)
    Explores significant aspects of human communication. Focuses on the role of communication in current affairs, business, and personal relations. Discusses practical application of theory to communication problems in everyday life.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    COMM 1101 - First Year Seminar - Communication

    (3)
    This is the official “Cornerstone” course for students within the Communication discipline. It is an orientation class for first year students which introduces students to institutional
    resources, opportunites, and programs that enhance their academic and social success. The Communication First Year Seminar Course provides an intellectual and social transition to the college while strengthening a variety of communication skills necessary for students to be successsful in both the academic and career endeavors.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    COMM 2005 - Intercultural Communication

    (3)
    This course is designed to give students an understanding and appreciation of different cultures and help them develop practical skills for improving their communication with people from other cultures. The class is descriptive, not prescriptive, in nature. Students will examine variables in intercultural communication while examining their own biases as a source of communication practices and developing an understanding of the ways culture affects communication. This course is both theoretical and practical. 

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    COMM 2010 - Public Speaking

    (3)
    An introductory course with emphasis on oral communication theory and practice. Provides a basic understanding of the significance of oral communication as well as instruction and practice in the basic skills of public speaking. Online versions of this course focus on audience analysis, message construction and delivery methods appropriate for communication using online delivery platforms in an increasingly digital world. 

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    COMM 2015 - Leadership Skills

    (1-3)
    This course is designed to educate specified groups in effective leadership skills. Includes discussion and practice in teamwork, communication, critical thinking and problem solving, planning, conflict management, and social responsibility.

    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
    (.5 hr lec, 1 hr lab)
  
  •  

    COMM 2060 - Forensics

    (1)
    Develops basic skills in contest and public service speaking by refining the speaking and thinking competence of students. Requires attendance at two competitive tournaments per semester in debate and/or individual events. May be repeated three times for credit.

    (2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    COMM 2070 - Introduction to Forensic Tournament Administration

    (1)
    This is a practical application course for students interested in the administration of forensics tournaments. Students learn through instruction and hands-on application of procedures designed to run both computerized individual events and computerized debate programs. Students receive information that includes specific procedures, ethical considerations, and financial applications. May be repeated once for credit.

    (1 hr lec)
  
  •  

    COMM 2080 - Introduction to Forensic Research

    (1)
    Designed to introduce students to materials used to prepare speeches for competitive purposes and provide opportunities for students to develop skills necessary to analyze, synthesize, and utilize information from a variety of sources. May be repeated

    (1 hr lec)
  
  •  

    COMM 2090 - Intro to Persuasion

    (3)
    Introduces rhetorical theory and communication practices related to the field of persuasion. Emphasizes persuasive campaigns, techniques, psychological factors, and persuasive applications in our society.

    Prerequisite: “Placement at English level 3.”
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    COMM 2110 - Nonverbal Communication

    (3)
    This course is designed to acquaint students with the non-linguistic aspects of communication. Since much nonverbal communication is culture-bound, this course will focus on the cultural aspects of nonverbal communication and of the understanding of cross-cultural differences in communication. Also, behavioral and environmental factors will be given emphasis in the context of understanding communication behaviors among various groups of people. 

    Prerequisite: COMM 1030 .
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    COMM 2120 - Small Group Communication

    (3)
    Instruction and practice in group communication and problem solving. Provides the format of study for understanding dynamics of group discussion with leadership, interpersonal relations procedures, and creative and critical thinking.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    COMM 2125 - Family Communication

    (3)
    Designed to explore the patterns of communication in family relationships. Uses a systems approach which provides a perspective for describing family interaction patterns and processes and considers external influences on the development of family rela

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    COMM 2135 - Gender, Communication, and Culture

    (3)
    This course is designed to give students an understanding and appreciation of gender in communications. The course will focus on the differences in communication and interaction based on gender and biological differences in the human species. The class is descriptive, not prescriptive, in nature. Students will examine variables in gendered communication while examining their own biases as a source of communication practices and developing an understanding of the ways society constructs norms for communication based on gender and gendered language. This course is both theoretical and practical. 

    (3 hr lec)
  
  •  

    COMM 2150 - Argumentation

    (3)
    Instruction in the principles of argumentative speaking. Practices various types of debate with emphasis on analysis, evidence, reasoning, case construction, and delivery.

    Prerequisite: “Placement at English level 3.”
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    COMM 3010 - Business and Professional Communication

    (3)


    This course focuses on the communication skills necessary for successful communication in business and professional settings: including interpersonal skills, interviewing, workplace writing, working in groups and teams, leadership and professional presentations. Readings, assignments, and discussions focus on communicating at work. As an advanced communication course, this course will emphasize discourse from the communication discipline used to communicate to academic and professional audiences. This course will emphasize communication through written, oral, and digital communication.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the BAS program.

     
    (3 hrs lec)

  
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    COMM 3190 - Cross-Cultural Communication

    (3)
    This course studies human communication processes within the context of various cultures and subcultures. It includes the study of the complex relationship between culture and communication in a variety of interpersonal, group, organizational, and computer-mediated settings. Application of theory and research to development of the knowledge, attitudes, and skills associated with intercultural communication competence.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the BAS program.
    (3 hrs lec)

Computer Applications

  
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    CMAP 1200 - Introduction to Computers

    (1)
    Students are introduced to computers and information systems. Course content includes study of hardware, software, computer architecture, information processing, data communications, information management, and social issues in computing. Course does not apply toward an AAS degree in Business Technology.

    (1 hr lec)

Computer Science

  
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    COSC 1010 - Introduction to Computer Science

    (4)
    An introduction to problem solving and programming using structured program development techniques. The course introduces programming in MATLAB, a high-level programming language. Experimentation with software in a closed laboratory supplements the discussion. 

    Prerequisite:  Concurrent enrollment or placement at math level 2 or higher one year prior to enrollment.
    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    COSC 1030 - Computer Science I

    (4)
    Algorithmic problem solving using principles of structured programming and object oriented design. Algorithms are implemented in a high level object oriented programming language. Graphical user interfaces are used to motivate the object approach. Programming exercises and experimentation with software in a closed laboratory supplement the discussion.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MATH 2200  or COSC 1010  or equivalent experience.
    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    COSC 2002 - Applications Development

    (3)
    This course introduces the fundamental concepts of application programming development from a user-oriented perspective. Topics include user interface development, algorithm development, flowcharting, and debugging techniques. Emphasizes good software engineering principles and, specifically, usability aspects when addressing user requirements. 

    Prerequisite: Successfully complete COSC 1010   Intro to Computer Science.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    COSC 2030 - Computer Science II

    (4)
    Use of and implementation of abstract data structures in an object oriented programming environment. Topics include lists, stacks, queues, tables, binary trees, graphs, space and time complexity, recursion and recursive data types. Programming exercises and experimentation with software in a closed laboratory supplement the discussion.

    Prerequisite: COSC 1030 .
    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    COSC 2150 - Computer Organization

    (3)
    This course introduces students to the organization and architecture of computer systems, beginning with the standard Von Neumann model and then moving forward to more recent architectural concepts. MARS will be used as a computer simulator, implementing the MIPS machine language codes and structure. In this course the student will examine the various components and structure of computer systems such as memory, central processors, peripheral equipment, networks, and other topics essential to the understanding of modern computer architecture. This will be accomplished through assignments, class presentatations, class discussions, projects, and other activities appropriate to the class. 

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ES 2200 - Introduction to Robotics

    (1)
    Students are introduced to the concepts that are fundamental in the understanding of how to design, build, program, and operate robots through a lecture-style atmosphere. Students will be expected to participate in note-taking, readings, discussions, and concurrent implementation of the presented material through the programming of microcontrollers and configuring of electronic and mechanical components. 

    Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in COSC 1010 .
    (1 hrs lec)

Criminal Justice

  
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    CRMJ 1020 - Introduction to Policing

    (3)
    Introduces the student to the roles of the police and the specific field of law enforcement. Topics include the historical origin of the police, the nature and styles of police organizations, an overview of the development and functioning of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies, the nature of police work, and patterns and issues of community and police relationships.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    CRMJ 1100 - Emergency Management

    (3)
    This course will examine the major categories of hazards, including meteorological and hydrological hazards, geological hazards, and manmade hazards. Understand the practice and politics of mitigation policy at the federal, state, and local government levels will be present as well. Assessing risk and vulnerability and identify hazards are key for the student to learn.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    CRMJ 1101 - Criminal Justice First Year Seminar

    (3)
    The Criminal Justice First Year Seminar course applies a “seminar-style” teaching to a learning community setting that is focused around a degree and career in Criminal Justice. This three-credit course is open to first year students. The course provides an intellectual and social transition to the college under the guidance of faculty/staff instructors in a small classroom environment of 15 or fewer students. The course encourages students to actively participate in their learning through critical inquiry; listening and contributing to class discussion; the class is designed to assist the student in developing skills that will help the student succeed in college and their chosen career field.

  
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    CRMJ 1201 - Introduction to Conservation Law Enforcement

    (3)
    This course introduces the student to the foundations of the profession of conservation law enforcement and its status in the 21st century. Topics include the essentials of the CLE profession, which spans traditional law enforcement, wildlife and environmental law enforcement, and park and recreational law enforcement. It also covers the law enforcement interface with natural resource management, information and education, and public and community relations services required of 21st century CLE professionals.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    CRMJ 1700 - Firearms I

    (3)
    This course will emphasize the principles and practices of safe firearms handling techniques and basic marksmanship fundamentals. The students will also be drilled on the effective methods of drawing and presenting the weapon in emergency situations. Enrollment is limited to majors in criminal justice except by permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CRMJ 2120  or CRMJ 1201 .
    (2 hr lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    CRMJ 1705 - Firearms II

    (3)
    This course will continue from skills developed in Firearms I including constitutional requirements, laws, and policies regulating the police use of force and the physiological and psychological effects of Use of Force in policing. The student will continue the use of pistol, OC spray, Taser, and be introduced to Less than Lethal Bean Bag/Shotgun and M4 Rifle in the VirTra 300LE Simulator.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of CRMJ 1700  with a C- or better.
    (2 hr lec 2 hr lab)
  
  •  

    CRMJ 2120 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

    (3)
    An exploration of the police, courts, and correctional agencies that oversee American justice. Examines process and philosophies that underlie the establishment of the modern criminal justice system.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    CRMJ 2130 - Criminal Investigations

    (3)
    An overview and examination of basic criminal investigation techniques, procedures, and methods. Topics include the theory of criminal investigation, information gathering and analysis, the collection and preservation of evidence, and investigation strategies and techniques.

    Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in CRMJ 1201  and CRMJ 2120 .
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    CRMJ 2201 - Environmental Law

    (3)
    This course covers the legal framework of environmental protection and natural resource management law as they have evolved in the United States. Administrative law, judicial review, and the public trust doctrine are foundational legal concepts of federal environmental and natural resource policy and law. Topics include laws associated with environmental impact assessment, air and water pollution control, water resources, wetlands, fish and wildlife, endangered species, and federal land management policies.

    Prerequisite: Take CRMJ 1201  Introduction to Conservation Law Enforcement, CRMJ 2210   Criminal Law, or consent of instructor.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    CRMJ 2210 - Criminal Law

    (3)
    A survey of the basic fundamental principles of American substantive criminal law. Topics include the nature and origin of criminal law, Constitutional limitations, criminal liability, criminal defenses and excuses, and exploration into the elements of criminal offenses.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    CRMJ 2230 - Law of Evidence

    (3)
    This course overviews basic evidentiary rules and procedures. Topics include different types of evidence, the burden and standard of proof needed in criminal and civil court, hearsay evidence, privilege of witnesses, the right to silence, admissions and confessions, search and seizure, and improperly obtained evidence.

    Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in CRMJ 2210 .
    (3 hrs lec)
 

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