Dec 04, 2022  
2021-2022 College Catalog 
    
2021-2022 College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


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Course Description Key
 

Physical Education - Professional

  
  •  

    PEPR 1040 - Sport First Aid

    (2)
    Coaches develop knowledge and skills necessary to recognize common sport injuries and administer the appropriate sport first aid to the injured or ill athlete. Designed to meet Wyoming State Coaches certification requirements for sport first aid. Upon successful completion of the course, coaches will receive ASEP certification in Sport First Aid and American Red Cross first aid.

    (2 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    PEPR 1115 - Rodeo Fundamentals: Timed Events

    (2)
    Students demonstrate an understanding of the rules, techniques, and safety practices of Timed Events (calf roping, steer wrestling, team roping, breakaway roping, barrel racing, or goat tying). Clinic emphasizes hands-on practice.

    (1 hr lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    PEPR 2012 - Physical Education for Elementary School

    (3)
    Trains prospective elementary teachers to develop every child’s need for strength, skills, health, and knowledge. Involves training with grade school children in the community.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    PEPR 2050 - Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries

    (2)
    Provides the prospective coach with the basic skills necessary to provide basic care for the injured athlete. Strongly emphasizes prevention, recognition, and care of athletic injuries, including conditioning, wrapping, padding, taping, physicals, nutrition and other means. Designed to meet Wyoming State certification requirements for coaches.

    (2 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    PEPR 2091 - Sports Officiating

    (1)
    Studies officiating techniques, rules, and the role of the official. Involves practical officiating experience.

    (1 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    PEPR 2100 - Theory of Coaching

    (2)
    Designed to meet the Wyoming State Coaches Certification Requirement. Prepares coaches in the fundamentals of coaching any sport.

    (2 hrs lec)
  
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    PEPR 2105 - Advanced Rodeo Skills: Roughstock

    (2)
    Students demonstrate an understanding of equipment preparation, advanced techniques, and safety practices of Roughstock Events (bull riding, saddle bronc riding, or bareback bronc riding). Clinic emphasizes hands-on practice on pro-stock.

    (1 hr lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    PEPR 2110 - Foundations of Coaching

    (2)
    Studies coaching philosophy and objectives. Includes study of sports psychology, pedagogy, physiology, and management. Assists participants to develop coaching style and teaches successful coaching techniques.

    (2 hrs lec)

Physical Education - Varsity Athletics

  
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    PEAT 1000 - Varsity Sports

    (1)
    Represents active participation on an athletic varsity team, attendance at practice, and some independent study. One specific sport will be emphasized in each section of this class (i.e., basketball, volleyball, wrestling or rodeo).

    (1 hr lec, 1 hr lab)
  
  •  

    PEAT 1005 - Varsity Sports

    (1)
    See PEAT 1000  for course description. Sophomore level.

    (1 hr lec, 1 hr lab)

Physics

  
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    PHYS 1090 - Fundamentals of the Physical Universe

    (4)
    Applies fundamental principles of Chemistry and physics to real life situations. Designed primarily for elementary education students.

    Prerequisite: Placement at math level 3.
    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    PHYS 1110 - General Physics I

    (4)
    Introduces fundamental laws of mechanics, thermodynamics, and wave motion. Some attention to processes of scientific discovery. For science and non-science students seeking a background in physics. Credit cannot be earned in this course if credit has been earned in PHYS 1310.

    Prerequisite: Placement at math level 3.
    (3 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    PHYS 1120 - General Physics II

    (4)
    Topics include electricity, magnetism, optics, light, relativity, and nuclear physics. A continuation of PHYS 1110 . PHYS 1110 .

    (3 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    PHYS 1310 - College Physics I

    (4)
    Students concentrate on physical sciences, math, or engineering and are introduced to the laws of classical mechanics (including mechanical waves and simple harmonic motion), and thermodynamics as applied to physical problems with an emphasis on theoretical development. Incorporates examples and topics from contemporary physics where appropriate.

    Prerequisite: MATH 2200 .
    (3 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab)
  
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    PHYS 1320 - College Physics II

    (4)
    Students are introduced to the laws of classical electromagnetism, classical optics and modern physics as applied to physical problems, with an emphasis on theoretical development. Incorporates examples and topics from contemporary physics where appropriate.

    Prerequisite: MATH 2200 .
    (3 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    PHYS 2149 - Nuclear Century

    (3)
    Students acquire an understanding and appreciation for the development of nuclear energy and the social, psychological, political, and environmental issues associated with it.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    PHYS 2320 - Modern Physics

    (3)
    Serves as an introduction to the fundamentals of quantum mechanics and explores many subfields that were facilitated by its formulation: nuclear, atomic, elementary particle, and condensed matter physics. In addition, the course delves into special and general theories of relativity and examines their applications in cosmology and astrophysics. Students will also consider the mathematical process of renormalization and the quest to formulate a unified model of the fundamental forces that reconciles quantum physics with general relativity.

    Prerequisite: PHYS 1320 . Corequisite: MATH 2310 .
    (3 hrs lec)

Political Science

  
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    POLS 1000 - American and Wyoming Government

    (3)
    An introductory course for political science programs that meets statutory requirements for instruction in principles and provisions of the constitutions of the U.S. and Wyoming.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    POLS 2000 - Current Issues in American Government

    (3)
    Reviews current policies and policy makers in American government. Makes a special effort to relate current political issues and government’s attempt to deal with them.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    POLS 2010 - Comparative Government

    (3)
    Surveys representative governing systems with selected foreign governments providing basis for course.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    POLS 2310 - Intro to International Relations

    (3)
    Surveys contemporary relations between the nations of the world. Introduces basic principles and conventional tools for conducting relations between nations.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    POLS 2350 - Leadership Skills: Model United Nations

    (3)
    Students learn to appreciate the United Nations’ mission and the role of diplomacy in the world today. It will provide students an in-depth understanding of the policy concerns and foreign policy options available to the assigned country. This course, however, goes beyond a book-learning approach to the UN. By participating in an intercollegiate Model United Nations simulation conference, students will be transformed into diplomats/government officials working inside an international body to achieve their goals. Students will participate in research, speech making, resolution drafting, consensus building, developing interpersonal relations, and will experience negotiations carried out every day by real diplomats. They will learn the basic rules by which UN diplomats operate and put the knowledge they have gained into effect by trying to craft agreements to solve real-world, real-time issues at the conference.

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    POLS 2460 - Intro to Political Philosophy

    (3)
    A survey of the history of western political thought including the study of concepts and approaches to political theory.

    (3 hours lec)

Professional Studies

  
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    PROF 3000 - Discovering/Utilizing Information and Ideas

    (3)
    Learning in this area guides students to accessing, evaluating, and utilizing information and ideas; communicating information and ideas effectively and responsibly; civic engagement for individual, organization, and community problem-solving, and applying new skills, knowledge, and perspectives in a contemporary society.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the BAS program.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    PROF 3110 - Personal Finance

    (3)
    Acquaints students with personal budgeting and financial matters and relates these activities to financial institutions involved.

     Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the BAS program.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    PROF 4117 - Community Leadership

    (3)
    Introduces students to the scope and functions of professionals working in rural communities as leaders. Students will explore community dynamics, leadership skills and managing change, and understand the complexities of leadership within communities. Understanding communities and leadership increases the likelihood of success for community-based professionals.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the BAS program.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    PROF 4350 - Problem Solving in Organizations

    (3)
    Covers management and leadership theories and techniques, problem solving, decision making, organizational communication, and design of organizational structures. Students apply theoretical and empirical findings to solutions of work-related problems.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the BAS program.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    PROF 4500 - Risk Analysis

    (3)
    Introduces basic concepts of risk analysis, including risk perception, identification, assessment, communication, management, and policy. Provides quantitative treatment of risk assessment procedures, fundamental mathematical models, and the concept of variability and uncertainly as well as practical experience in risk analyses conducted by teams of students.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the BAS program.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    PROF 4600 - Developing Organizational Leadership

    (3)
    A senior capstone experience for Bachelor of Applied Science students, bringing together reading, research, writing, and communication skills to focus on a major project. Leadership skills and approaches to organizational problem-solving are deepened using the structural, human resource, political, and symbolic frames to change and improve leadership and organizational culture.

     Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the BAS program.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    PROF 4985 - Seminar: Development in Community Leadership

    (3)


    Emphasizes basic core components of individual leadership: assessment of leadership skill and style; community-based experiences for understanding of community and resources; group community development projects for students; engagement with others and the community. Upon completion, students understand various leadership styles and philosophies and articulate their personal leadership philosophy.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the BAS program.

     
    (3 hrs lec)


Psychology

  
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    PSYC 1000 - General Psychology

    (3)
    Introduces the principles of human behavior as related to biological, physiological, mental, learning, personality, and social factors in human development.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    PSYC 1200 - Human Development

    (3)
    A study of human development from conception to death. Student examines changes in the human organism throughout the life span. Covers physical growth, changes in learning and cognitive processes, emotional and social development, and key decision points in human existence.

    Prerequisite: PSYC 1000 .
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    PSYC 2000 - Research Psychological Methods

    (4)
    A lecture and laboratory course introducing students to methods of investigating behavioral science questions. Students learn research strategies including observation, survey, program evaluation, and experimentation. Emphasizes experimental methods. A writing intensive course.

    Prerequisite: PSYC 1000 , Completion of 10 hours in Psychology recommended, successful completion of at least 30 credit hours.
    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    PSYC 2080 - Biological Psychology

    (3)
    Introduces biological bases of behavior. Includes ethology and comparative behavior, psychobiological development, physiological and sensory mechanisms of behavior, and evolution and behavioral genetics. Presents basic structural and functional properties of the nervous system.

    Prerequisite: 4 hours of psychology. 4 hours of biology recommended.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    PSYC 2210 - Drugs and Behavior

    (3)
    This course will provide a sound introduction to drugs which affect behavior, emphasizing drugs with abuse potential.  This includes an introduction to pharmacology, the physiology of the brain, and the mechanisms of drug action.  This course will also cover behavioral, social, historical, legal, clinical and medical aspects of each major class of psychoactive drugs. 

    Prerequisite:   
    (3hrs lec)
  
  •  

    PSYC 2340 - Abnormal Psychology

    (3)
    Students acquire a general overview of abnormal behavior emphasizing types, etiology, and treatment methods.

    Prerequisite: PSYC 1000 .
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    PSYC 2380 - Social Psychology

    (3)
    A study of the ways in which a person’s perceptions, thoughts, feelings, desires, behaviors, and values are influenced by other people. Also examines how an individual can affect the functioning of the groups to which he or she belongs. Credit cannot be earned in both PSYC 2380 and SOC 2380.

    Prerequisite: PSYC 1000  or SOC 1000 .
    (3 hrs lec)

Range Ecosystem/Watershed Mgt

  
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    REWM 1000 - Intro to Rangeland Management

    (1)
    Orientation to range management as a field of study and as a profession including assistance in preparing the student’s academic program.

    (1 hr lec)
  
  •  

    REWM 2000 - Principles of Rangeland Management

    (3)
    This course covers the basic principles of range management as they affect livestock production, wildlife management, grazing systems and patterns, grazing regions, and vegetation types. Range vegetation with livestock uses and range nutrition in related areas are all examined. Several field trips included.

    Prerequisite: REWM 1000  Intro to Rangeland Management
    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    REWM 2100 - Forest Management

    (3)
    An introduction to the principles and goals of forestry. Includes biology of trees and forest ecosystems, management objectives and methods, and commercial aspects of the forest industry.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    REWM 2225 - Rangeland Plant Identification

    (2)
    Students learn about the distribution and sight identification of western United States rangeland plants.

    (1hr lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    REWM 2410 - Rangeland Ecosystems

    (2)
    This course allows students to learn the distribution of major rangeland ecosystems in North America and key plants within those ecosystems. Characteristics of the ecosystems help determine conservation principles and management practices. It is intended for students involved in natural resource management, wildlife management, or range and livestock production.

    (2 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    REWM 2420 - Rangeland Plant Taxonomy

    (2)
    This course allows students to learn to recognize and identify by scientific and common name the major rangeland plants of North America. Skills are gained in using taxonomic keys for major plant groups. This practical knowledge and skills are essential for rangeland managers and natural resource specialists. 

    Prerequisite: Take REWM 2410 .
    ( 2 hrs lal)

Social Science

  
  •  

    SOSC 1101 - Social Science First Year Seminar

    (3)
    SOSC-1101 is the official “Cornerstone” course for those Social Science disciplines that have required it as a mandatory orientation class for freshman students, which introduces students to the institution, opportunities and programs that enhance their success, their own degree program and requirements, as well as the expectations of the broad “Social Sciences” with regard to research, writing, and ethical considerations.  Students will also survey the disciplines of the Social Sciences regarding content and methodologies.  Outcomes that lead to the required “Capstone” experience of every student in the Social Sciences are defined.

  
  •  

    SOSC 2395 - Seminar in Social Science Research

    (3)
    Students learn about the traditions and research techniques of various social science disciplines. Students acquire familiarity with library, Web-based, and other data collection methods, as well as rules of evidence and logical argumentation. Each student completes a research paper and presents the results in a multimedia format.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 30 credit hours, and   or consent of the instructor.
    (3 hrs lec)

Sociology

  
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    SOC 1000 - Sociological Principles

    (3)
    Seeks to understand the social and cultural dimensions of life and those factors which influence human behavior. Seeks to broaden the student’s exposure to a wide variety of cultures, subcultures, and modes of behavior.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    SOC 1100 - Social Problems

    (3)
    Students examine current social problems in America by utilizing basic sociological concepts and methods. Topics include: health care, poverty, crime, prejudice, drug use, inequality, and population/immigration.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    SOWK 2000 - Introduction to Social Work

    (3)
    Seeks to familiarize students with the basic principles, methods, and skills of social work. Considers career opportunities in social work and related professions.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    SOC 2325 - Marriage and Family

    (3)
    A consideration of scientific research and expert insight with regard to dating, marriage, and family life. Includes such topics as dating, love, marital adjustment, finance management, marital conflict, sex, pregnancy, childbirth, and childbearing. 

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    SOC 2350 - Race and Ethnic Relations

    (3)
    This course examines social relations among majority and minority groups by devoting particular attention to race and ethnic relations in the U.S. It incorporates social science and neuroscience approaches to this topic, which emphasize socialization, perception, adaptation, and power structures historically and today. It devotes attention to social psychological issues such as prejudice, and social structural issues such as class inequality.

    Prerequisite: take a 3 credit course in ANTH, CRMJ, GNDR, HIST, POLS, PSYC or SOC.
  
  •  

    SOC 2400 - Criminology

    (3)
    Introduction to the field of criminology describing the nature and extent of crime in the United States. Topics include theories on crime causation, classifications of crime, collection of crime statistics, and the Criminal Justice System’s response to controlling crime. Credit cannot be earned in both SOC 2400 and CRMJ 2400.

    Prerequisite: SOC 1000 .
    (3 hrs lec)

Spanish

  
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    SPAN 1010 - First Year Spanish I

    (4)
    Introduces the essentials of Spanish necessary for oral and written use of the language. Gives practice in speaking, reading, understanding, and writing as well as introduces Spanish culture. Requires the use of an audio program with each chapter. Previous Spanish language experience is not required.

    (4 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    SPAN 1020 - First Year Spanish II

    (4)
    Continuation of SPAN 1010 . More cultural topics covered. Requires the use of an audio program with each chapter.

    Prerequisite: Two years of high school Spanish or Completion of SPAN 1010  with a “C-” or higher.
    (4 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    SPAN 2030 - Second Year Spanish I

    (4)
    Reviews basic grammar and introduces advanced grammar structures. Gives practice in conversation. Includes an introduction to Hispanic literature and more cultural information.

    Prerequisite: Three years of high school Spanish or completion of SPAN 1020  with a “C” or higher or 2 or more years of a Spanish language immersion experience.
    (4 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    SPAN 2040 - Second Year Spanish II

    (4)
    Continuation of SPAN 2030 . More concentration on conversation, composition, literature, and culture.

    Prerequisite: Three years of high school Spanish, or completion of SPAN 1020  with a “B-” or higher, or SPAN 2030  with a grade of “C” or higher, or 2 years or more of a Spanish immersion experience.
    (4 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    SPAN 2460 - Field Studies

    (1-3)
    An introduction to the culture, geography, history, and language of a Spanish-speaking country. Course normally includes preparation prior to travel along with intensive language study and cultural experience in a foreign country.

    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
    (1-3 hrs lec)

Statistics

  
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    STAT 2050 - Fundamentals of Statistics

    (4)
    Covers descriptive measures, probability, discrete and continuous distributions, ideas and applications of statistical inference, hypothesis testing, and an introduction to regression and correlation. Emphasis on decision-making applications. Introduces statistical computer packages in weekly labs.

    Prerequisite: A grade of “C-” or better in MATH 1400 , MATH 1050 MATH 1450  or placement at math level 3 within one year prior to enrollment.
    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    STAT 2070 - Intro to Statistics for Social Science Majors

    (4)
    Presents central ideas of descriptive statistics and statistical inference, as applied to questions in social sciences. Includes graphs, averages, sampling, estimation, hypothesis-testing and relationships between variables. Introduces associated computer skills in weekly labs.

    Prerequisite: A grade of “C-” or better in MATH 1400 , MATH 1050 MATH 1450 , or placement at math level 3 within one year prior to enrollment.
    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)

Theatre

  
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    THEA 1000 - Intro to Theatre

    3
    Introduces various phases of the theatre in an effort to enhance appreciation of theatre as a performing art.  Designed to give a general knowledge of theatre through the ages. 

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    THEA 1100 - Beginning Acting

    (3)
    Students learn the basic practices of acting examining the fundamental principles of oral and physical interpretation. Also provides practical experience in a variety of theatrical activities.

    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    THEA 2050 - Theatre Practice

    (1-3)
    Students audition, rehearse, and perform assigned roles for public theatre presentation. Course may be repeated once for credit.

    (2 hrs lab per credit)
  
  •  

    THEA 2100 - Acting II

    (3)
    Students develop the actor’s voice and body for characterization and character interaction through performance of scenes. Character and scene development through research, personal exploration/exercise, and performance are the key learning elements. 

    Prerequisite: THEA 1100 .
    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    THEA 2120 - Oral Interpretation

    (3)
    Students develop an appreciation of literature by interpreting it orally for an audience. Students learn principles and skills of interpreting prose, poetry, and dramatic literature.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    THEA 2460 - NWC on Broadway

    (1-3)
    Student have the opportunity to travel to New York City to participate in a variety of theatre opportunities and view a variety of off Broadway and Broadway theatre productions.  Students will be encouraged to participate in and learn from the NYC theatre culture.

    (1-3 hrs lec)

Welding Technology

  
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    WELD 1555 - Welding Technology Safety and Problem Solving

    (2)
    This course covers personnel protection, fire prevention, welding on closed containers, ventilation, proper use of equipment, and treatment of minor injuries. May be repeated once for credit. For students seeking a degree in Welding.

    (2 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    WELD 1600 - General Arc Welding

    (2-3)
    This course is an introduction to oxyacetylene, electric arc and cutting torch. Different welding units and basic welds in main positions, economy in use of equipment, and special emphasis on safety are covered. Flexible credit contingent on enrolled lab hours. Open to any student. 

    (1.5 hrs lec, 1-3 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    WELD 1650 - Print Reading

    (3)


    This course is a study of blueprint reading and basic drafting practices used in the welding and manufacturing industry. It provides training in reading and drawing blueprints and welding symbols through the development of comprehensive plans. For students seeking a degree in Welding.

     

     

    (3 hrs lec)

  
  •  

    WELD 1700 - General Welding

    (2-3)
    This course is an in-depth study and practice in arc welding, all positions, with a variety of metals. Oxyacetylene instruction includes brazing, aluminum, and cast iron. Flexible credit contingent on enrolled lab hours. Open to any student.

    Prerequisite: WELD 1600  with a “C-” or better.
    (1.5 hrs lec, 1-3 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    WELD 1705 - Welding Processes

    (4)
    This course is designed for the new learner specializing in welding, providing the students with lecture and hands-on experience. Emphasis is on oxyacetylene welding, electrical arc welding, portable welding machines, and improving welding skills. For students seeking a degree in Welding.

    (2 hrs lec, 4 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    WELD 1765 - Advanced Welding Processes

    (4)
    This course covers MIG and TIG skills; pipe welding skills; higher skills of welding copper, aluminum and stainless steel. For students seeking a degree in Welding.

    Prerequisite: WELD 1705  with a “C-” or better.
    (2 hrs lec, 4 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    WELD 1770 - GMAW - FCAW

    (4)
    Students will gain technical understanding of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) equipment, metal transfer, shielding gases, and welding safety. Emphasis will be placed on short circuit, globular, and spray transfer; Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW); and inner shield.

    (2 hrs lec, 4 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    WELD 1785 - Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Plate and Pipe

    (4)
    Students will learn about Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) which is an individual specialty that is demonstrated and performed on mild steel, stainless steel, and aluminum in all position fillet and butt joints. Information and practical experience is also included on pipe joints with root penetration and filler passes according to applicable codes.

    (2 hrs lec, 4 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    WELD 1800 - Materials Evaluation

    (3)
    This course provides an introduction to the field of destructive and nondestructive testing of metals. It examines testing methods in evaluation of various welding processes. For students seeking a degree in Welding.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    WELD 1860 - Welding Fabrication

    (4)
    Students acquire knowledge of welding fabrication by emphasizing construction of welded projects, utilization of blueprints and specifications, and repair and maintenance of industrial equipment. For students seeking a degree in Welding.

    (1 hr lec, 6 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    WELD 1870 - Advanced Metal Fabrication Techniques

    (4)
    Consists of developing plans and producing a finished project. Various welding positions and assembly techniques are utilized. For students seeking a degree in Welding.

    (1 hr lec, 6 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    WELD 1920 - Basic Pipe Welding

    (4)
    Arc welding of pipe in various positions and techniques are covered in this course. Safety electrode selection and certification codes are also included. Open to any students.

    Prerequisite: WELD 1700  with a “C-” or better.
    (2 hr lec, 4 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    WELD 1940 - Robotics Technology

    (4)



    Students learn to program, set up, and operate a Computer Numeric Controlled (CNC) cutting system. Information is encoded into a software program which interprets the information and automatically operates a robotic arm attached to a plasma cutter. Material is then cut in predetermined shapes and forms.

    (2 hrs lec, 4 hrs lab)

  
  •  

    WELD 1960 - Specialized Applications in Welding

    (1-3)



    This course provides the learner with a technical understanding of gas metal arc welding and gas tungsten arc welding, welding equipment setup, metal transfer, shielding gasses and welding safety. The course also provides hands on experience in any aspect of welding and alloys that are weldable using the process of tig and mig welding. 

    (.5 hr lec, 1-5 hrs lab)

  
  •  

    WELD 2610 - Ornamental Iron Work

    (3)
    Students learn basic acetylene and MIG welding skills as well as 3-D art design elements. Course is intended for students interested in the basics of welding for personal use, set construction, or metal sculpture.

    (1 hr lec, 4 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    WELD 2670 - Welding Inspection Technology

    (3)
    Students learn about magnetic particle, dye penetrant, eddy current, radiographic and ultrasonic inspection of ferrous and nonferrous metals. For students seeking a degree in Welding.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    WELD 2680 - Welding Metallurgy

    (3)
    Students gain an introduction to the field, emphasizing physical aspects. This course is centered around steel and ferrous alloys in the properties of metals with a view to their use and application. For students specializing in Welding.

    Prerequisite: Completion of WELD 1705   or WELD 1765 .
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    WELD 2700 - Welding Certification(Plate)

    (4)
    Students gain an understanding of the theory and practice on plate metal with emphasis on certification. Includes work on various thicknesses and positions. Methods include arc, TIG, and MIG. For students seeking a degree in Welding.

    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
    (1 hr lec, 6 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    WELD 2710 - Welding Certification(Pipe)

    (4)
    Students study and practice pipe certification tests. Includes work on API 1104 and other industry tests. Covers arc, TIG, MIG, and oxyacetylene techniques. For students seeking a degree in Welding.

    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
    (1 hr lec, 6 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    WELD 2750 - Metals Production

    (4)
    Students will work on project production, weld test study, and technical reporting. For students seeking degree in Welding.

    Prerequisites: WELD 1860  with a “C-” or better and successful completion of at least 30 credit hours.
    (1 hr lec, 6 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    WELD 2800 - Plastic Welding

    (4)
    Students acquire knowledge, skills, and experience to use proper procedures in thermoplastic welding.

    (2 hrs lec, 4 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    WELD 2970 - Internship: Welding

    (1-6)
    Designed for serious students interested in experiences on and off campus leading to transfer programs in vocational education, business engineering, or other options connected to Welding Technology. Also available to students who wish to broaden their occupational experiences to include experience in shop management, maintenance and repair, or other aspects of the welding environment. S/U grading only. 

    Prerequisite: WELD 1705  with a “C-” or better.
    (2 hrs lab per credit hour)
  
  •  

    WELD 2985 - Welding Seminar

    (4)
    Open to advanced students for project production, weld test study, and technical reports. For students seeking a degree in Welding. Capstone Course

    Prerequisites: WELD 2750  with a “C-” or better and successful completion of at least 30 credit hours.
    (2 hrs lec, 4 hrs lab)

Zoology

  
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    ZOO 2010 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    (4)
    This course Includes cell chemistry, cellular structure and function, histology, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and peripheral nervous systems and special senses. Emphasis focused on the functional anatomy of the human body. Laboratory activities complement the lecture material with an appropriate balance between anatomy and physiology. This course will meet the Physical and Natural World requirement at NWC. However, transfer institutions may want both ZOO 2010 and ZOO 2020. (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)

    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
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    ZOO 2020 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    (4)
    This course is a continuation of ZOO 2010 . Topics of emphasis include the central nervous, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, and digestive systems, urinary and reproductive systems, and gen

    Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in ZOO 2010 .
    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
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    ZOO 2450 - Principles of Fish & Wildlife Management

    (3)
    Includes an introduction to the history of wildlife management and the ecological needs of wildlife species. Studies management strategies for wildlife in various ecological settings. Acquaints students with goals, methods, and problems of wildlife management. (3 hrs lec)

    (3 hrs lec)
 

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