Dec 04, 2022  
2021-2022 College Catalog 
    
2021-2022 College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


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Course Description Key
 

Criminal Justice

  
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    CRMJ 2350 - Introduction to Corrections

    (3)
    This course is a general overview of the historical origin of America’s correctional system. Students will be familiarized with the formal structure, organization, and operation of our correctional systems as well as introduced to aspects of community- based corrections.

    Prerequisite: CRMJ 2120  or CRMJ 2400 /SOC 2400 .
    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    CRMJ 2400 - Criminology

    (3)
    Introduction to the field of criminology describing the nature and extent of crime in the United States. Topics include theories on crime causation, classifications of crime, collection of crime statistics, and the Criminal Justice System’s response to controlling crime. Credit cannot be earned in both CRMJ 2400 and SOC 2400.

    Prerequisite: SOC 1000 .
    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    CRMJ 2450 - Ethics in Criminal Justice

    (3)
    This course presents the three major ethical schools of thought (virtue, formalism, and utilitarianism) in a clear way that emphasizes how ethics impacts individual decision-making. This course explains the continuing role of ethics in contemporary criminal justice including: police, courts, corrections, and individual liability and responsibility in general.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    CRMJ 2685 - Research in Criminal Justice

    (3)
    This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the application of research methods used in criminology. The focus will be on interpretation and application of research findings, topics will include data collection, survey design, dataset usage, historical analyses, qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will learn how to apply and interpret research finds based on real examples in criminological studies. 

    (3 lec hrs)

Crop Science

  
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    CROP 1150 - Pesticide Safety and Application

    (3)
    In this course, basic chemical principles are reviewed and applied to an in-depth study of herbicides, insecticides, and fertilizers. Students become familiar with selection methods and rates. They also learn about laws governing purchase and use of insecticides and fertilizers. Particular attention is given to environmental concerns. The integrated pest management approach to total pest control is stressed. 

    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    CROP 2200 - Forage Crop Science

    (3)
    Studies major forage grasses and legumes with emphasis on production practices, harvest, storage, utilization, and pasture management.

    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)

Economics

  
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    ECON 1010 - Macroeconomics

    (3)
    The study of how economic society is organized and uses scarce resources to provide for its material wants. National income analysis, business cycles, the banking system, and monetary and fiscal policy.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    ECON 1020 - Microeconomics

    (3)
    Course emphasizes value and price theory, monopoly and public policy, markets for productive goods and services, labor economics, alternative forms of economic organization, and international trade.

    (3 hrs lec)

Education

  
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    EDUC 1501 - Effective Substitute Teaching

    (2)
    This course provides the training needed for a permit to substitute teach in the state of Wyoming as regulated by the Wyoming Professional Teaching Standards Board. Students will work to demonstrate competency in the required outcomes designated by the WPTSB which include: age level communication skills, use and application of lesson plans, use of instructional technology, and professional attitudes and behaviors. The course requires 24 clock hours of classroom instruction time and 30 hours of observation in the schools. 

    Prerequisite: Placement at English level 3.
    (2 hrs lec)
  
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    EDUC 2100 - Practicum in Teaching

    (3)
    Students will participate in an extensive practicum experience for prospective educators in an accredited school under the supervision of a certified teacher. Capstone Course

    Prerequisites: Must have completed EDFD 2020  and EDFD 1101 , have successfully completed at least 30 credit hours, and have consent of the ins
    (1.5 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab)
  
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    EDUC 2135 - Fundamentals of Art for Teachers

    (2-3)
    This course is designed for K-8 education candidates, currently certified teachers, or for students who want to explore an education methods class. This is a hands-on class which emphasizes the National and State Art Standard expectations for K-8 students. 

    (2-3 hrs lec)

Education - Early Childhood

  
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    EDEC 1020 - Intro to Childhood Education

    (3)
    An introduction to the field of early childhood education including history, curriculum, and philosophy. Explores the developmentally appropriate environment and its effect on the learner in the physical, cognitive, and social domains. This course also introduces students to early childhood environments including, but not limited to, daily schedules, classroom design, transitions, and lesson planning. Observations are made in local preschools, Kindergarten classrooms and primary grades.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    EDEC 1030 - Infant and Toddler Care

    (3)
    This course provides information on growth and development of children under the age of three along with curriculum implications; defines the interactive role of the caregiver, and explores other components of infant toddler care including implementation of quality programming and adult interactions. It will include a field experience.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    EDEC 1100 - Observation and Guidance of Young Children

    (3)
    A study of the principles of guidance and the development of skills to meet children’s needs individually and in groups, with an emphasis on promoting a positive and constructive climate in the early childhood setting. Classroom management techniques including organizing environments, scheduling, assessments, parent-teacher communication and related areas will be covered in class as well as during the field experience.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    EDEC 1200 - Administration of Early Childhood Programs

    (3)
    This course studies information and procedures relating to organizing and administering family and/or group child care programs. This course includes guidelines for developmentally appropriate practices for caregivers and programs. Grant writing and funding options will be discussed along with licensing requirements and record keeping strategies.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    EDEC 1300 - Curriculum Planning and Development for Young Children

    (2)
    Students will develop skills in planning, implementing, and evaluating developmentally appropriate experiences to encourage the intellectual, physical, social, emotional and creative growth in young children with the focus on the whole child. This cour

    Prerequisite: EDEC 1020 .
    (2 hrs lec)
  
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    EDEC 1305 - Curriculum Planning & Development for Young Children Lab

    (1)
    This course is the experiential portion of course EDEC 1300, giving students the hands-on experience for learning and planning, implementing, and evaluating curriculum while working with young children in a supervised lab environment.

    Prerequisite: Completion of EDEC 1020  and concurrent enrollment in EDEC 1300 .
    (1 hr lab)
  
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    EDEC 2010 - Special Education for Children Birth to 8

    (3)
    Students acquire an understanding of the importance of inclusion, early intervention, service coordination, and support for families and children in order to provide a seamless system of services for early childhood special education from birth to eight. Students will examine research-based information regarding best practices and the Individual with Disability Education Act (IDEA). They will also explore in-depth methods being employed by early interventionists. 

    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    EDEC 2200 - Early Childhood Practicum

    (3)
    Students observe and participate in programs and settings with young children. Students learn through lecture and practical applications in a supervised experience. Capstone Course

    Prerequisites: EDEC 1020 , FCSC 2121 , and successful completion of at least 30 credit hours.
    (1.5 hrs lec, 6-12 hrs lab)
  
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    EDST 2450 - Foundations of Development and Learning

    (3)
    This course offers an overview of human development including conception, childhood, adulthood, and death and dying. Students examine the changes in the human organism throughout the lifespan to include physical growth, changes in learning and cognitive processes, emotional and social development, and key decision points in human existence. The course is taught from an educational view point with a focus on ways in which learning and development must be considered when addressing theoretical and practical perspectives in teaching.

    (3 hrs lec)

Education - Elementary School

  
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    EDEL 1410 - Elementary School Math Seminar I

    (1)
    A hands-on application course designed to examine some of the methods used to teach mathematics topics covered in MATH 1100 .

    Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1100 .
    (1 hr lec)
  
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    EDEL 1430 - Life Science in the Elementary School

    (1)
    Course provides material, curricula, and teaching strategies in life science appropriate for elementary school.

    Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 1000  or BIOL 1010 .
    (1 hr lec)
  
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    EDEL 1440 - Physical Science in the Elementary School

    (1)
    Designed to cover a selection of basic physical science concepts, materials, and curricula appropriate for elementary school. Requires observation and participation in an assigned elementary classroom during science teaching activities.

    Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 1090  or PHYS 1090 .
    (1 hr lec)
  
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    EDEL 1450 - Earth Science in Elementary School

    (1)
    Designed to cover a selection of basic earth science concepts, materials, and curricula appropriate for elementary schools. Emphasizes methods and materials to facilitate elementary students’ exploration of the earth and human interaction with it. 

    Prerequisite: GEOL 1100 , ASTR 1005  or ASTR 1050 .
    (1 hr lec)
  
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    EDEL 2280 - Literature for Children

    (3)
    Surveys children’s literature for concentrations in elementary education, library science, and other disciplines interested in evaluating and using children’s books according to needs, interests, and abilities of children.

    (3 hrs lec)

Education - Exceptional Children

  
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    EDEX 2484 - Introduction to Special Education

    (3)
    Designed to meet the needs of educational majors for a required course in Special Education, this course is a survey of the basic characteristics and unique educational and life needs of populations of children and youth who have been determined to differ significantly from their average peers in terms of mental, physical, and/or emotional characteristics. It is also an introduction to those educational and related programs known as special education in contemporary public schools. This aspect of the course will include programming theories and approaches, legal requirements, and other general topics.

    (2.5 hrs lec, 1 hr lab)

Educational Foundations

  
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    EDFD 1101 - Intro to Education

    (3)
    This course is designed to assist freshman education majors in learning about career opportunities in the field of education at the P-K to 12-grade levels. Students will gain and explore pertinent information about the various levels of formal schooling. Various career options of educators and requirements to become a teacher/educator at the pre-K, elementary, middle, high-school levels, and special areas will be covered in the course.

    (3 hr lec)
  
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    EDFD 2020 - Foundations of Education

    (3)
    Historic, philosophic, and social foundations of American education explored in relation to contemporary curricular organization and instructional approaches. Emphasizes the nature of teacher and learner, the nature of knowledge, the relationship of government to education, and the roles of government in society. 

    Prerequisite: Completion of EDFD 1101 - Intro to Education  with a “C” or better.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    EDFD 2100 - Educational Psychology

    (3)
    Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of psychological concepts, principles, and research relevant to teaching and learning with emphasis on the school setting.  

    (3 hrs lec)

Electrical Apprenticeship

  
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    ELAP 1515 - Electrical Apprenticeship I

    (5)
    Provides the beginning electrical apprentice with necessary skills and knowledge to ensure safe and efficient work practices on the job. Topics include safety, introduction to the National Electrical Code, basic electrical theory, lighting and appliance circuits, and wiring methods. First course in a series of eight.

    Prerequisites: Status as a first-year Electrical Apprentice with an Independent Electrical Contractor and registration with the State of Wyoming Electrical Board of the Department of Fire Prevention and Electrical Safety as an apprentice electrician.
    (5 hrs lec)
  
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    ELAP 1525 - Electrical Apprenticeship II

    (5)
    Provides the first-year electrical apprentice with necessary skills and knowledge to ensure safe and efficient work practices on the job. Topics include series and parallel circuits, electric power, electrical theorems, special outlets, service calculations, and applications of the National Electrical Code. Second course in a series of eight.

    Prerequisites: ELAP 1515 , status as a first-year Electrical Apprentice with an Independent Electrical Contractor and registration with the State of Wyoming Electrical Board of the Department of Fire
    (5 hrs lec)
  
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    ELAP 1535 - Electrical Apprenticeship III

    (5)
    Provides the second-year electrical apprentice with necessary skills and knowledge to ensure safe and efficient work practices on the job. Topics include safety, AC electricity, inductance, capacitance, transformers, motors, and applications of the National Electrical Code. Third course in a series of eight. 

    Prerequisites: ELAP 1525 , status as a second-year Electrical Apprentice with an Independent Electrical Contractor and registration with the State of Wyoming Electrical Board of the Department of Fir
    (5 hrs lec)
  
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    ELAP 1545 - Electrical Apprenticeship IV

    (5)
    Provides the second-year electrical apprentice with necessary skills and knowledge to ensure safe and efficient work practices on the job. Topics include wiring methods, branch and feeder circuits, motor calculations, transformer sizing, and applications of the National Electrical Code. Fourth course in a series of eight.

    Prerequisites: ELAP 1535 , status as a second-year Electrical Apprentice with an Independent Electrical Contractor and registration with the State of Wyoming Electrical Board of the Department of Fir
    (5 hrs lec)
  
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    ELAP 1555 - Electrical Apprenticeship V

    (5)
    Provides the third-year electrical apprentice with necessary skills and knowledge to ensure safe and efficient work practices on the job. Topics include safety, blueprint reading, construction procedures, grounding and ground fault calculations, and service calculations based on the National Electrical Code. Fifth course in a series of eight. 

    Prerequisites: ELAP 1545  , status as a third-year Electrical Apprentice with an Independent Electrical Contractor and registration with the State of Wyoming Electrical Board of the Department of Fir
    (5 hrs lec)
  
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    ELAP 1565 - Electrical Apprenticeship VI

    (5)
    Provides the third-year electrical apprentice with necessary skills and knowledge to ensure safe and efficient work practices on the job. Topics include industrial and commercial services, alarm systems, hazardous locations, and applications of the National Electrical Code. Sixth course in a series of eight. 

    Prerequisites: ELAP 1555 , status as a third-year Electrical Apprentice with an Independent Electrical Contractor, and registration with the State of Wyoming Electrical Board of the Department of Fir
    (5 hrs lec)
  
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    ELAP 1575 - Electrical Apprenticeship VII

    (5)
    Provides the fourth-year electrical apprentice with necessary skills and knowledge to ensure safe and efficient work practices on the job. Topics include safety, motor controls, power distribution, solid state controls, and programmable controllers. Seventh course in a series of eight.

    Prerequisites: ELAP 1565 , status as a fourth-year Electrical Apprentice with an Independent Electrical Contractor, and registration with the State of Wyoming Electrical Board of the Department of Fi
    (5 hrs lec)
  
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    ELAP 1585 - Electrical Apprenticeship VIII

    (5)
    Provides the fourth-year electrical apprentice with necessary skills and knowledge to ensure safe and efficient work practices on the job. Topics include advanced motor controls, branch and feeder circuits, service entrance and grounding calculations based on the National Electrical Code, and review for the State Journeyman Exam. Eighth course in a series of eight.

    Prerequisites: ELAP 1575 , status as a fourth-year Electrical Apprentice with an Independent Electrical Contractor, and registration with the State of Wyoming Electrical Board of the Department of Fi
    (5 hrs lec)

Emergency Medical Technician

  
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    EMT 1500 - Basic Emergency Medical Technician

    (8)
    This course is designed for preparation of the Emergency Medical Technician Basic. Includes the anatomy and physiology of the human body, techniques of emergency treatment of various injuries and emgergency situations, and other topics related to emergency medical and first aid practices. Course includes 188 hours of classroom and laboratory instruction and 24 hours of ambulance ride-time or emergency room observation. The course meets the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) curriculum and Wyoming EMS Licensure standards. Successful completion of the course prepares the student to take the national registry written examination and the Wyoming practical assessment. 

    (3 hrs lec,3.5 hrs lab,.5 hrs clinical)
  
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    EMT 1550 - EMS Theory

    (1)
    This course is for individuals who are a current EMT and have completed the Basic EMT coursework from an institution or organization outside of Northwest College. This course supports the successful transition into the Northwest College EMS Program by focusing on the more difficult concepts such as sepsis, shock, or medical patient management and prepares students for entry-level into the Advanced EMT content. This course is appropriate to refresh and strengthen EMT knowledge, and for EMT’s to earn continuing education. Online only. 

    Pre-requisite: EMT (Basic) License.
    (1 hr lec)
  
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    EMT 1650 - Basic EMT to Advanced EMT

    (4)
    This course is for individuals who seek a pathway to Advanced EMT through concurrent enrollment in Basic EMT ( EMT 1500) or entry as a current Basic EMT seeking the advanced skill set and licensure as an Advanced EMT. Students will focus on National EMS Standards of education concepts outlined for the advanced provider and will be prepared to sit for the National EMS Advanced EMT certification and licensure. Didactic portion online, with face-to-face lab and clinical time required. Concurrent enrollment in EMT 1550 EMS Theory is required for Basic EMTs who have completed their coursework outside of Northwest College.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EMT 1550 EMS Theory or EMT (Basic) License.
    (2 hrs lec/.05 hrs lab/1.5 hrs cln)
  
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    EMT 2500 - Advanced Emergency Medical Technician

    (8)
    This course is designed for preparation of the Emergency Medical Technician-Advanced. This course is intended to build on the skills attained by an Emergency Medical Technician-Basic. The course includes advanced patient assessment, cardiovascular emergencies, advanced cardiac life support techniques, manual defibrillation, medical emergency medication, cardiac medication administration, intravenous therapy, multi-lumen intubation, pain medication, and pain management with medication. Course includes 155 classroom and laboratory instruction hours for comprehensive skills learning, review of ground/air operations, ICS/MCI, extrication and HazMat response and 48 hours of clinical experiences to solidify skill set.  This course meets the 2014 National Emergency Medical Services Education Standards and Wyoming EMS Licensure standards. Successful completion of the course prepares the student to take the EMS national registry written examination and the Wyoming written and practical assessment.

    Prerequisite EMT 1500  Basic Emergency Medical Technician or EMT Basic Certification.
    (8 lec hrs)
  
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    EMT 2600 - Paramedic I

    (10)
    The foundations of Paramedicine including pre-hospital pharmacology, advanced cardiac rhythm interpretation, and airway support. Emphasis will be placed on the Paramedic’s role in the team environment that is EMS. Lab and the opportunity for field experience to cement newly-learned skills will be provided. Active participation in health and agility will be expected.

    Prerequisite: EMT-Advanced licensure & Admission to the Paramedic Program.
    (10 hrs lec)
  
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    EMT 2625 - Paramedic II

    (10)
    Incorporating pathophysiology and epidemiology into decision-making, the candidate is introduced to more advanced Paramedicine with the formation of treatment plans for medical patients, and understanding the kinetics and homeostatic requirements of trauma patients. Field experience will be provided to reinforce the advanced treatment processes learned. Heath and agility requirements continue as well as lessons on sleep and rest for the pre-hospital provider.

    Prerequisite: successful completion of EMT 2600 , minimum grade B-.
    (10 hrs lec)
  
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    EMT 2650 - Paramedic III

    (8)
    Mastering the skills learned thus far the candidate continues to develop well-constructed treatment plans for any patient presented to them. Special patient populations will be explored and addressed for their unique needs. Crisis resource management will be discussed, including how to manage the human element of the scene. Lab will be a critical component of this final course as it will prepare the candidate to pursue team leads during his/her Capstone. The candidate will also continue to participate in fitness and agility, while also learning of the value of meditation and managing stress in intense environments.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of EMT 2625 , minimum grade B-.
    (8 hrs lec)
  
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    EMT 2700 - Paramedic Capstone

    (9)
    The culmination of the didactic and lab portion of the course. The candidate is required to obtain 50 successful team leads in a live environment with a preceptor evaluating their performance in the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective realm. Candidate will be pursuing team leads and exposure to different types of calls and skills required to become a successful entry-level Paramedic. Must also participate in a classroom-driven national Registry preparation, including further didactic and lab reviews to prepare the candidate for testing. 

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of EMT 2650  with a minimum grade B-.
    (9 hrs lec)

Engineering Science

  
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    ES 1000 - Orientation to Engineering Study

    (1)
    Introduction to skills and professional development related to engineering. Includes the engineering method, ethics, how to think and communicate visually, and the history and design of engineering. Provides activities to help the student transition to the rigorous engineering curriculum. Recommended for all entering freshmen engineering students. 

    (.5 hr lec, 1 hr lab)
  
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    ES 1060 - Intro to Engineering Problem Solving

    (3)
    Introduces the use of computers in solving a wide variety of engineering and science-oriented problems. Includes documentation and report writing, computing tools for writing reports and presenting data in graphical form, equation solving, and manipulation of tabular data. 

    Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in MATH 2200 .
    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
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    ES 2070 - Engineering Surveying

    (3)
    Principles of surveying and map making. Operation and use of surveying instruments, including Total Station and Data Collector. Measurement of distances, horizontal and vertical curves, open and closed traverse, area and volume calculations, and land subdivisions. Conversion of field data to electronic formats such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) programs.

    Prerequisite: MATH 1405  or MATH 1450 .
    (1 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
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    ES 2110 - Statics

    (3)
    A vector approach to mechanics of stationary particles and rigid bodies. Considers external forces, moments, frictional forces, and fluid statics.

    Prerequisite: MATH 2200 .
    (3 hrs lec)
  
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    ES 2120 - Dynamics

    (3)
    Principles of particles and rigid body motion developed in vector form and applied to engineering problems, emphasizing force-mass acceleration, work-energy, and impulse-momentum.

    Prerequisites: Previous or concurrent enrollment in MATH 2205  and PHYS 1310 .
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ES 2210 - Electrical Circuit Analysis

    (3)
    Basic concepts of electric circuit theory including dependent sources, network theorems, first and second order circuits and phasors.

    Prerequisites: Previous or concurrent enrollment in MATH 2205 .
    (3 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab)
  
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    ES 2310 - Thermodynamics

    (4)
    Introductions of thermodynamic variables, processes, and laws, followed by derivation of thermodynamics relations applied to real physical problems. Concepts include mass, energy, and entropy balances; availability; reversible and irreversible processes.

    Prerequisites: MATH 2205  and ES 2120  or PHYS 1310 .
    (4 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ES 2330 - Fluid Dynamics

    (3)
    Students study incompressible flow of ideal and real fluids at rest and in motion. Fluids may be liquids, vapors, gases, or combinations of these. The effects of static forces and compressibility are given special attention. Kinematics, dynamics, flow, resistance, and physical effects of flow are considered in detail for moving fluids. Potential and stream functions and similitude and dimensional analysis are also studied. 

    Prerequisites: ES 2110  and previous or concurrent enrollment in ES 2310 .
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ES 2410 - Mechanics of Materials

    (3)
    Analysis of design of members subjected to various types of loadings. Includes the mechanics of deformable bodies.

    Prerequisite: ES 2110 .
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ES 2670 - Practical Surveying

    (2)
    Designed for students in the AAS Drafting program who do not wish to continue their education beyond the AAS degree level. Students will learn to measure distance, elevation, and angles using surveying equipment; demonstrate equipment handling procedures; write out different methods of recording field data; and other skills required to perform surveying duties. The lab portion of this course will include intensive field work and learning the principles of surveying in a concentrated format.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1510 .
    (1 hr lec, 2 hrs lab)

Engineering Technology

  
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    ENTK 1500 - Engineering Graphics

    (3)
    Students acquire the theory and practice of graphical representation and visualization of three-dimensional (3D) objects. Students also explore sketching methods and computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) techniques using AutoCAD and Autodesk Inventor software to create and edit two-dimensional (2D) drawings and 3D models. Students develop skills in drawing, visual perception, technical communication, and problem solving. 

    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ENTK 1710 - Architectural Drafting I

    (3)
    An introductory AutoCAD and architectural drafting course in which students learn the AutoCAD commands and computer aided design and drafting (CADD) practices used to develop fully dimensioned residential floor plans and electrical plans.

    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ENTK 1720 - Architectural Drafting II

    (3)
    A basic through advanced AutoCAD and architectural drafting course in which students learn the AutoCAD commands and computer aided design and drafting (CADD) practices used to develop fully dimensioned residential roof plans, exterior elevations, interior elevations, framing plans, foundation plans, sections, and details. 

    Prerequisite: ENTK 1710 .
    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ENTK 1770 - Structural Drafting

    (3)
    A basic through intermediate AutoCAD and structural drafting course in which students learn the AutoCAD commands and computer aided design and drafting (CADD) practices used to develop the structural components of a set of working drawings for timber, steel, concrete block, and concrete tilt-up structures. 

    Prerequisites: ENTK 1720  and ENTK 2505 .
    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ENTK 2500 - Computer Aided Drafting I

    (3)
    An introductory AutoCAD and mechanical drafting course in which students learn the AutoCAD commands and computer aided design and drafting (CADD) practices used to develop fully dimensioned multi-view and auxiliary view drawings.

    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ENTK 2505 - Computer Aided Drafting II

    (3)
    A basic through advanced AutoCAD and mechanical drafting course in which students learn the AutoCAD commands and computer aided design and drafting (CADD) practices used to develop a complete set of working drawings, including fully dimensioned multi-view, auxiliary view, section view, revolution, conventional break, and assembly drawings. Also explores the engineering change process.

    Prerequisite: ENTK 2500 .
    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ENTK 2530 - Computer Aided Drafting 3-D

    (3)
    In this mechanical drafting course, students learn the Autodesk Inventor parametric design and solid modeling software tools and computer-aided drafting practices used to develop 3-dimensional solid models. Students learn how to set up constraints and establish relationships among the features of a 3-D model. The skills learned in this course help optimize the design of components and equip the student’s knowledge to design complex 3-dimensional parts, combine these parts into assembly models, and document the designs with 2-dimensional technical drawings.

    Prerequisite: ENTK 2505 .
    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ENTK 2535 - Computer Aided Drafting 3D II

    (3)
    Computer Aided drafting 3-D II is an intermediate mechanical drafting course utilizing Autodesk Inventor software. Students will learn to create parametric, three-dimensional solid models and drawing sets in this intermediate Autodesk Inventor course.

    Prerequisite: previous enrollment in ENTK 2530 .
    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ENTK 2540 - Civil 3-D Drafting Technology

    (3)
    Students gain knowledge and skill in using Autodesk’s Civil 3-D software for Civil Engineering. Major topics include site development, survey of data imports, create and analyze surfaces, model road corridors, create parcel layouts, perform grading volume calculation tasks, and layout pipe networks. Civil 3-D experience provides Civil Engineers, Surveyors, Designers, and Drafters with a comprehensive knowledge in the design, drafting, and management of a wide range of civil engineering projects. The knowledge and understanding of Civil 3-D software benefits graduates from our two-year Drafting Program who seek employment with Civil Engineering Companies, and, additionally provides students with the extra tools to compete and succeed at a four-year university. 

    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ENTK 2550 - Civil Drafting Technology

    (3)
    A basic through advanced AutoCAD and civil drafting course in which students learn the AutoCAD commands and computer aided design and drafting (CADD) principles and practices used in the civil drafting field. Students are introduced to mapping, surveying, GIS, in-depth coverage of legal descriptions, plot plans, contour lines, profiles, highway layout, and earthwork drawings. 

    Prerequisites: ENTK 1720  and ENTK 2505 .
    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ENTK 2650 - Introduction to Computer Animations - Fundamentals of 3ds Max

    (3)
    The 3ds max (TM) Fundamentals Course teaches the fundamentals of 3ds max. The course contains both informational material and practical exercises that go beyond the basic functionality of the software and explains techniques used by production artists including animation, modeling, materials, lighting, rendering, and scene creation.

    Prerequisite: ENTK 2500  or consent of instructor.
    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    ENTK 2685 - Project Drafting

    (3)
    An advanced project-based capstone course in which students use AutoCAD to prepare a complete set (when appropriate) of working mechanical or architectural drawings, depending on student interest. Working in the drafting industry is simulated by allowing students the opportunity to complete a real-world drafting project that includes a wide range of experience in the selected drafting field. Students rely on the AutoCAD commands, computer aided design and drafting applications, drafting theory, and resources explored throughout the Drafting Technology program to show, through quantity and quality of drawings, that they have achieved skill development and knowledge in the selected drafting field. 

    Prerequisites: BMIS 2000 , ENTK 1710 , ENTK 1720 ENTK 2500 ,  ENTK 2505 ,  ENTK 2530 , and successful completion of at least 30 credit hours. 
    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)

English

  
  •  

    ENGL 0610 - Basic Writing II

    (3)
    Designed for students whose background in English has not prepared them for college-level writing. Course covers instruction and provides writing practice in the organization of short compositions. Reviews sentence elements and usage as necessary. 

    Prerequisite: placement at English level 2.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 0910 - ENGL 1010 Workshop

    (2)
    ENGL 0910 is a co-requisite course for ENGL 1010 - English Composition I . In this workshop course, students will receive individualized instruction in support of ENGL 1010 assignments. This work shop is an opportunity for students to work on grammar, organization, argumentation, format, and reading skills.

    Co-Requisite: Co-Requisite: ENGL-1010
    (2 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 1000 - English Conversation Partners I

    (2)
    This class provides additional instruction and practice for students who are non-native speakers of English in conversational skills. It is dedicated to meeting the academic needs of students so they can perform on an academic level required by their instructors in college classrooms. It is designed to improve the skills necessary in oral communication and listening, using special topics. 

    (2 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 1001 - English Conversation Partners II

    (2)
    This class builds on the skills mastered in ENGL 1000. Emphasis is placed on the colloquial and academic conversation skills. Pronunciation, idiomatic skills, fluency, and appropriate use of common words will be stressed. Students will also prepare special topics to discuss with a native speaker of English.

    Prerequisite:   or testing into the class.
    (2 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 1010 - English Composition I

    (3)
    Students learn essential elements of academic writing at the college level as they write informative, analytical, and argumentative essays. Students also practice skills required for writing based on research.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0610  with “C-” or better, co-requisite enrollment in ENGL 0910 or placement at English level 3.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 1050 - Introduction to Film Studies

    (3)
    Introduces the study of film as a modern form of art, providing an historical overview of themes and techniques. Examines cinema as an expression of both personal and social values.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 1210 - English as a Second Language

    (3)
    Provides non-native speakers of English with instruction in this area. The course is designed for students from other countries who are attending school in the United States for the first time. Students will cultivate speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills using individual learning styles.

    Prerequisite: TOEFL score of 500 or consent of Instructor.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 1211 - English as a Second Language II

    (3)
    This class builds on the skills mastered in ENGL 1210. Students will listen to authentic content-based material and respond appropriately using intermediate to high level academic English. Also, they will prepare their own academic project to be presented to the class

    Prerequisite:  , testing into the class or consent of instructor.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 1212 - Intermediate ESL, Reading and Writing Skills I

    (3)
    This class provides instruction in reading, writing, and study skills using authentic content-based material. The course is designed for intermediate to high intermediate non-native English speaking students who are preparing to enter American college or university. The class builds on step-by-step processes for effective academic reading and writing. The integrated skills will give the students a real-life exposure to an American academic classroom. 

    Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor 
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 1213 - Intermediate ESL, Reading and Writing Skills II

    (3)
    This class builds on the skills mastered in ENGL 1212. Written expression is emphasized and explored through careful analysis of essays. Organization, support, focus, and mechanics of writing are developed, as well as grammatical accuracy and vocabulary.

    Prerequisite:  , testing into the class or consent of instructor.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 2002 - Social Media for K12 Teachers

    (3)
    This course provides an overview of social media platforms with an emphasis on teaching K - 12 students “Cyber Civics” and digital privacy. Enrollment in the K12 Computer Science Endorment Certificate is required.

    .
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 2005 - Writing in Technology and the Sciences

    (3)
    Develops writing styles specifically suited to technological and scientific fields of study. Includes focus on disciplinary conventions and styles as well as audience/readership considerations. Introduces techniques for data interpretation and visualization, and helps students analyze, understand, and adapt common field genres and formats.

    Prerequisites: successful completion of ENGL 1010  with a “C” or better.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 2007 - Literature and Science

    (3)
    This interdisciplinary reading and writing course is devoted to the study of the relationship between science and literature, including a historical overview of the seperation of the two modern attempts to reunite the two fields, and the ways that literature is a forum for the critique, appraisal, and assessment of science and technology in culture.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 2020 - English II: Literature, Media, and Culture

    (3)
    Introduces students to the basic tools of literary, film, and media analysis and develops students ‘critical writing, digital analysis, and oral  communication skills. Relevant for all majors.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010  with a “C” or better.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 2030 - Critical Reading and Writing

    (3)
    Focuses upon the twin skills of analytical reading and interpretive writing. The connection between reading and writing is the ability to use critical thinking, and a study of critical thinking within the course provides the foundation for the other two skills.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010  with a “C” or better.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 2035 - Writing for Digital Media

    (3)
    This course focuses on analyzing and producing texts, including multimedia messages, designed for public audiences. The class empasizes effective writing for a particular purpose and audience, collaborative skills, and use of digital technology necessary for ethical, appropriate participation in public conversations. In addition to written work, the course requires oral presentations, peer workshops, and collaborative writing projects, and significant use of online communication tools and platforms.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010   with a “C” or better.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 2041 - Creative Writing: Nonfiction

    (3)
    Focuses on the research, organization, and writing of creative nonfiction (e.g., essay, memoir, article) as well as the study of major voices in creative nonfiction. Emphasizes the development of literary writing techniques in addition to exploring key ethical issues that surround the genre.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 2050 - Creative Writing: Fiction

    (3)
    Emphasizes the writing of fiction and nonfiction prose.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 2055 - Creative Writing in the Wild

    (3)
    This is an on-site, nature writing course set primarily in the Greater Yellowstone Basin. Equipped with writing journals, students will explore the landscape of back-country trails, wildlife viewing areas, geyser walks, etc. Emphasis will be on observation and writing, utilizing techniques culled from representative nature writers. The course includes an on-campus introductory lecture and post-seminar final. Generally, this course will be taught in conjunction with “Art in the Wild,” a three-credit visual art course offered by the Art Department.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010  with a “C-” or better or consent of Instructor.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 2080 - Creative Writing: Poetry

    (3)
    Emphasizes the writing of poetry, with attention to various poetic forms.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 2280 - Introduction to Mythology

    (3)
    Gives an understanding of the meaning of mythology and its impact on literature. Uses readings of mythological interest in Greek and Roman literature and examines the use of mythological names and ideas for analogy or allusion in general literature.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 2340 - Native American Culture and Literature

    (3)
    Students acquire a broad cultural understanding of Native Americans, past and present. Emphasizes folklore and literature.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 2400 - Introduction to Folklore

    (3)
    Surveys the areas of folklore and studies folklore’s importance to history, literature, and everyday life. Credit cannot be earned in both HUMN 2030 and ENGL 2400. 

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    ENGL 2425 - Literatures in English I

    (3)
    Surveys major figures and literary movements written in English through 1789.

  
  •  

    ENGL 4010 - Technical Writing in the Professions

    (3)
    Enhances professional writing skills applicable to a variety of professions. Includes audience analysis and adaption, information design and use of visuals, and a range of formats and genres. Emphasizes clarity and precision of language. May feature primary research and problem-based or service learning projects.

    Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the BAS program.
    (3 hrs lec)

Equine Studies

  
  •  

    EQST 1500 - Basic Horsemanship

    (1)
    For those with little riding experience or those who wish to improve riding skills. Covers leading, grooming, bridling, saddling, and stable management plus use of seat, hands, and legs to influence control of horse. Uses either English or western tack. College does not provide horses. 

    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 
    (.5 hr lec, 1 hr lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1510 - Equine Nutrition

    (2)
    Includes study of essential nutrients, digestive physiology, and the varying nutrient requirements from birth to maturity.

    (2 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    EQST 1520 - Horse Production I

    (3)
    A study of health care, common health problems, and preventing and treating illness. Includes the mechanics of movement, learning theory, behavior, and equine limitations.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    EQST 1525 - Horse Production II

    (3)
    A study of stable design and maintenance. This course examines breeds, genetics, safety factors, record management, and legal aspects of the horse industry.

    Prerequisite: EQST 1520 .
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    EQST 1540 - Applied Horse and Stall Care I

    (1)
    Students are responsible for twice daily feeding and stall care. Covers proper watering, grooming, foot and veterinary care; aisleway, arena, and tack maintenance; and specific adherence to rules and procedures concerning horses in the Equine Center. Emphasizes basic health and horse care records; types of feed, composition, and evaluation of additives and supplements; and safe handling of horses. College does not provide horses. 

    (2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1545 - Applied Horse and Stall Care II

    (1)
    Students are responsible for twice daily feedings and stall care. Covers proper watering, grooming, foot and veterinary care; aisleway, arena, and tack maintenance; and specific adherence to rules and procedures concerning housing horses in the Equine Center. Emphasizes stable designs, geographic locations, space needs, costs, operational needs, long-term planning, and records. College does not provide horses.

    Prerequisite: EQST 1540  with a “C-” or better.
    (2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1550 - Equine Evaluation I

    (2)
    Anatomy and conformation of the horse as related to various breeds judged. Specific rules and regulations of breed associations. Includes lecture, visual appraisal, judging terminology, and preparation of oral reasons.

    (1 hr lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1560 - Equine Artificial Insemination

    (2)
    Discussion of the anatomy of the reproductive systems and physiology of the reproductive and endocrine systems as they relate to successful artificial insemination. Labs involve practice of collection, evaluation, and insemination techniques.

    (1 hr lec, 2 hrs lab)
 

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