Nov 26, 2022  
2021-2022 College Catalog 
    
2021-2022 College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


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Course Description Key
 

Equine Studies

  
  •  

    EQST 1645 - Tack, Fit, and Function

    (3)
    Students will learn the correct use of Western and English tack including conformation of the horse as it relates to tack usage and how to fit tack to the horse and rider. Includes hands-on experience using training devices and learning how to identify and fit tack for jobs in sales, training, and riding table operations.

    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1650 - Equine Evaluation II: Competitive

    (2)
    Designed for students who have completed EQST 1550  and who are second-year level judges. All classes of horses judged with emphasis on competitive judging. Oral reasons presentation stressed. 

    Prerequisite: EQST 1550 .
    (1 hr lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1660 - Equine Evaluation

    (2)
    Continued instruction in the development of skills needed to become knowledgeable with the specific rules and regulations of breed associations in regards to performance classes. Lecture, as well as visual appraisal, judging terminology and scoring of classes will be the objective of this course.

    Prerequisite: EQST 1550 .
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    EQST 1680 - Horse Handling and Behavior

    (2)
    Management of the horse on the ground. Topics include foal/stallion handling, restraints, behavior of horses, and general management of a horse facility. College does not provide horses.

    (1 hr lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1700 - Riding I

    (3)
    An introduction to the theories of riding correct western horsemanship including centered riding, correct aids and balances in the saddle. Students will also practice and apply equine safety rules, grooming techniques and health management. Student is required to have a sound, broke horse for this course. Prerequisites: Admittance to the Equine Riding Program. Students must attend one weekend clinic or horse show to pass this course.

    (1 hr lecture, 3 hrs labs, 1 hr arr. lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1705 - Riding II

    (3)
    Continuing emphasis will be placed on the theories of riding correct western horsemanship including centered riding, correct aids and balances in the saddle. Students will continue to practice and apply equine safety rules, grooming techniques and health management. Student will develop strength and feel for riding through a series of mounted and un-mounted exercises. Student is required to have a sound, broke horse for this course.

    Prerequisites: Admittance to the Equine Riding Program and EQST 1700   Riding I. Students must audit one weekend clinic or horse show to pass this course.
    (1 hr. lecture, 3 hrs labs, 1 hr arr. lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1805 - Farrier Science I

    (2)
    Course covers proper methods of trimming and shoeing to promote equine soundness and performance. Students learn to understand and recognize good basic foot care. Prepares students for understanding and performing correct, corrective, and therapeutic shoeing taught in more advanced classes.

    (1 hr lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1810 - Farrier Science II

    (3)
    Studies conformation and gaits. Introduces corrective and therapeutic shoeing. Students learn to balance and shoe straight, gentle horses.

    Prerequisite: EQST 1805 .
    (1.5 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1815 - Production Shoeing I

    (3)
    Designed to provide students with information and skills in basic forge work, trimming, and shoeing.

    Prerequisite: EQST 1805  or concurrent enrollment.
    (1 hr lec, 4 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1820 - Production Shoeing II

    (3)
    A continuation of EQST 1815 . Course provides more advanced information and skills in forge work, trimming, and shoeing.

    Prerequisite: EQST 1815 , EQST 1810 , or concurrent enrollment.
    (1 hr lec, 4 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1825 - Production Shoeing III

    (3)
    A continuation of EQST 1820. Students will acquire more advanced information and skills in forge work, trimming, and shoeing. This course further prepares students for the AFA certified examination.

    Prerequisite: EQST 1820 .
    (1 hr lec, 4 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1830 - Production Shoeing IV

    (3)
    A continuation of EQST 1825 . Students will acquire mastery of the essential information and skills in forge work, trimming, and shoeing necessary to pass the AFA certified examination.

    Prerequisite: EQST 1825 .
    (1 hr lec, 4 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1850 - Blacksmithing I

    (2)
    Students acquire practical skills in the ancient art and craft of blacksmithing. Students will learn to create simple, useful items. Artistic expression is encouraged. Students also learn how to establish a blacksmith shop with a small initial investment.

    (1 hr lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1860 - Blacksmithing II

    (2)
    Students acquire the skills to make tools facilitated by the use of the power hammer. Students will make tools used in blacksmithing and horseshoeing. Will also include advanced horseshoe making.

    Prerequisite: EQST 1850 
    (1 hr lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1910 - Special Applications in Equine Studies

    (1-3)
    Course addresses a diversity of equine subjects. Topics vary and may be drawn from areas within the equine field. Utilizes lecture, lab, or clinic format for student instruction. Jumping, dressage, western riding, veterinary care, stable management, and other related subjects exemplify areas of instruction. Course may be repeated using different topic titles. A maximum of 6 credits may apply toward the Equine Riding and Training degree. 

    (1 hr lec or 2 hrs lab per credit hour)
  
  •  

    EQST 1930 - Training and Development of the Western Horse I

    (3)
    Students will practice and apply training exercises to begin finishing a started horse. Exercises will include an overview of groundwork and training techniques used to train a horse for riding purposes, with a strong emphasis on training for events that would be seen at a horse show. Student will need a 3 or 4-year-old horse that has been started but not finished for this course. 

    Prerequisites: Admittance to the Equine Training Program.
    (1 hr lecture, 3 hrs labs, 1 hr arr. lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 1940 - Training and Development of the Western Horse II

    (3)
    Students will continue to practice and apply training exercises designed to finish a started horse for the purpose of riding. This course will include a strong emphasis on training for events that would be shown at a horse show. Students will practice and apply how to set training goals for each individual horse. Students will continue to train the horse they used for EQST 1930.

    Prerequisites: EQST 1930 with a C- or better.
    (1 hr lec, 3 hrs lab, 1 hr arr. lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 2100 - Riding III

    (3)
    This course is a continuation of EQST 1705 ; Riding II. Students will continue to develop their riding skills through specific exercises used to develop strength, feel and timing for applying the correct aids needed to train a horse. Student will be expected to develop and use all riding exercises at an intermediate level. Beginning training techniques will be introduced in this course. Student is required to have a sound broke horse for this course.

    Prerequisite: Completion of EQST 1705 Riding II. Students must audit one weekend clinic or horse show to pass this course. May repeat twice for credit.
    (1 hr lec, 3 hrs labs, 1 hr arr. lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 2150 - Riding IV

    (3)
    This course is a continuation of EQST 2100 and builds on developing proficiency in the intermediate training exercises for a variety of western venues. With emphasis placed upon training and strengthening exercises for the horse and rider. To pass this course, students must attend a minimum of two weekend clinics or horse shows. Student is required to have a sound broke horse for this course.

    Prerequisite: completion of EQST 2100 Riding III. May repeat twice for credit.
    (1 hr lec, 3 hrs lab, 1 hr arr. lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 2500 - Equine Health Management

    (2)
    A basic review of the major diseases that affect equine. A portion of the class covers specific anatomy affected by diseases, a review of appropriate pharmacology, and the development of a general herd health management program that agriculture producers can adapt to their own operation.

    (1 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 2510 - Competitive Equine Judging

    (2)
    Designed for students who have completed EQST 1550  and EQST 1650 . Students compete in intercollegiate horse judging.

    Prerequisites: EQST 1550  and EQST 1650 .
    (2 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    EQST 2515 - Horse Show/Clinic/Event Management

    (2)
    Emphasis will be placed on the management skills needed to preside over the setup and operation of an open or breed horse show and/or clinics or other events. These skills may include but will not be limited to making flyers, advertising, hiring judges or clinicians, preparing the arena for the scheduled event, analyzing arena footing for the different events, finding ring stewards, announcers, show secretaries, bookkeeping, gate people, ordering ribbons and numbers, making arrangements for stalling, keeping track of year end award points, and hiring concessions if needed. Students in the course will have hands on experiences running two open shows and/or one show and one clinic/event.

    (.5 hr lec, 3 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 2520 - Equine Breeding

    (3)
    Management of the stallion and the mare in breeding. Topics include types of breeding practices, behavior and psychology of handling stallions, the mare in the breeding role, hormone cycles, artificial aids such as light and drug therapy, actual foaling of a mare, growth of the foal in the uterus, recognition of foaling problems, and care of the newborn foal and mare. 

    Prerequisite: ANSC 2430 .
    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 2540 - Applied Horse and Stall Care III

    (1)
    Students are responsible for twice daily feeding and stall care. Covers proper watering, grooming, foot and veterinary care; aisleway, arena, and tack maintenance; and specific adherence to rules and procedures concerning housing horses in the Equine Center. Emphasizes budgets, marketing, records, available computer programs, total management of facilities, and stable record for horse. College does not provide horses.

    Prerequisites: EQST 1540  and EQST 1545  with a “C-” or better.
    (2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 2545 - Applied Horse and Stall Care IV

    (1)
    Students are responsible for twice daily feedings and stall care. Covers proper watering, grooming, foot and veterinary care; aisleway, arena, and tack maintenance; and specific adherence to rules and procedures concerning housing horses in the Equine Center. Emphasizes design and budget of stable facility, justified designs and budgets, and stable record for horse. College does not provide horses. 

    Prerequisites: EQST 1540 , EQST 1545 , and EQST 2540  with a “C-” or better.
    (2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 2550 - Training the Young Horse I

    (2)
    For the student desiring further knowledge in colt breaking including theory and techniques used in training a young horse, lunging, ground driving, problems that occur in riding a horse the first time, and the training sequence for achieving a “green broke” horse. Class limited to 6 students. College does not provide horses.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least 30 credit hours.
    (1 hr lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 2555 - Training the Young Horse II

    (2)
    Preparation of green broke horse for advancement to a level appropriate for showing at futurities or preparation for marketing of young broke horses. Class limited to 6 students. College does not provide horses.

    Prerequisites: EQST 2550  with a “C-” or better and successful completion of at least 30 credit hours.
    (1 hr lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 2800 - Fundamentals of Teaching Riding

    (3)
    A methods course to prepare the prospective riding teacher. Includes knowledge of seat and its application to dressage, jumping, western riding, class control, and lunge line work; kinesiology of riding; and psychological problems. Students must attend a minimum of three weekend (Saturdays and/or Sundays, specific dates noted on course syllabus) clinics or horse shows to pass this course.

    (2 hrs lec, 2 hrs arr lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 2930 - Training and Development of the Western Horse III

    (3)
    Students will continue to practice and apply training exercises designed to finish the horse for the purpose of showing. This course will include a strong emphasis on equine biomechanics of movement while training. Students will practice and apply how to set training goals for improving movement and frame for their individual horse. Students will continue to train the horse they used for EQST 1940.

    Prerequisites: EQST 1940 with a C- or better. May repeat twice for credit.
    (1 hr lec, 3 hrs lab, 1 hr arr lab)
  
  •  

    EQST 2940 - Training and Development of the Western Horse IV

    (3)
    Students will practice and apply training exercises to change leads and ride one handed in a shank bit while executing the maneuvers they learned in the past semester. This course will include a strong emphasis on correct movement of the horse while riding in a shank bit. Students will continue to practice and apply training goals for improving movement and frame for their individual horse and develop a sports psychology plan for themselves. Students will continue to train the horse they used for EQST 2930. 

    Prerequisites: EQST 2930 with a C- or better.
    (1 hr lec, 3 hrs lab, 1 hr arr lab)

Family and Consumer Sciences

  
  •  

    FCSC 1141 - Principles of Nutrition

    (3)
    Emphasizes the relationship of food to maintenance of health. Includes the human needs for energy and nutrients and their importance to the individual and society. Also stresses the importance of diet throughout the life cycle.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    FCSC 2121 - Child Development

    (4)
    Covers growth and developmental patterns in physical, social, intellectual, and emotional areas in relation to children ages birth through eight. Includes opportunities to observe principles of growth in children through an assignment in a field experience setting and identifies developmentally appropriate activities to foster development of the whole child.

    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)

Finance

  
  •  

    FIN 1000 - Personal Finance

    (3)
    This course is designed to help students become financially literate and empower them with the ability to make good financial decisions. It is designed as a course appropriate for all college students, and will cover financial basics like budgeting, managing cash and savings, understanding consumer credit, and financial planning.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    FIN 2000 - Principles of Banking

    (3)
    Provides an insight into U.S. commercial banking and financial activities. Presents a broad overview of the history, functions, and regulations concerning the U.S. monetary system.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    FIN 2100 - Corporate Finance

    (3)
    Students study the theory of corporate finance and the management of capital within a corporation or business. Time value of money, cash flow analysis, stock and bond valuations, risk and return, capital budgeting, capital structure, the cost of capital budgeting, capital structure, the cost of capital and dividend policy are also examined.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 2010  and STAT 2050  or STAT 2070  .
    (3 hrs lec)

Food Science

  
  •  

    FDSC 2040 - Principles of Meat Animal Evaluation

    (3)
    Provides study of the fabrication of carcasses into cuts, associated processing techniques, selection, preparation, and utilization of meat. Explores concerns and opportunities of the producer, packer, processor, retailer, and food service.

    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
    (1.5 hrs lec, 3 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    FDSC 2160 - Meat Poultry and Game Products

    (2)
    Designed to enable students to properly care for and process game carcasses. Covers field care and aging; preparing sausage, and jerky; and curing/ smoking poultry, fish, and wild game.

    (1 hr lec, 2 hrs lab)

Gender Studies

  
  •  

    GNDR 1000 - Introduction to Gender Studies

    (3)
    This course is an introduction to the study of gender as a category for social and cultural analysis. We will study the intersection of gender, class, race/ethnicity, nationality, age and sexuality and will examine how those intersections shape our experiences, our culture, and the social institutions we inhabit. The course is a survey of gender construction and will use critical theory to examine gender within the areas of social institutions, literature history, visual art, film, biological theories, psychology, and popular culture.


Geography and Recreation

  
  •  

    GEOG 1000 - World Regional Geography

    (3)
    Students acquire the basic concepts of geography including: map reading, physical characteristics, and environments; weather/climate; regional concepts; comparative cultural, political, and economic characteristics.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    GEOG 2310 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    (4)
    Students acquire an introductory-level understanding of the principles and practices of geographic information systems (GIS), both as an interactive spatial database and as a powerful analytical tool. Students learn the theory of mapping and spatial data analysis as well as learn to use GIS software through exercises and projects.

    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)

Geology

  
  •  

    GEOL 1030 - Geology of Northern Wyoming

    (3)
    A survey of the physical features, processes, and history of the mountains of northern Wyoming. Emphasis on Big Horn Basin and Mountains, Absaroka and Beartooth Mountains, and Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. For the non-geologist; does not fulfill lab science requirement. 

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    GEOL 1035 - Geology Yellowstone National Park

    (1)
    Introduction to the rocks, landscapes, and thermal features of the Park. Emphasis placed upon hot springs and geysers, volcanic activity, glaciations, and stream erosion. Material covered during a two-day field trip through the Park. For the non-geologist; does not fulfill lab science requirement. Limited enrollment.

    (2 hrs lab delivered through 24 clock hours in the field)
  
  •  

    GEOL 1100 - Physical Geology

    (4)
    Modern concepts of the earth’s physical makeup including materials (minerals and rocks), topography, and crustal structure, as well as processes and forces acting on the earth including continents’ motions, earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain building, and erosion. Required field trips emphasize local geology.

    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    GEOL 1200 - Historical Geology

    (4)
    A survey of the physical and biological history of the earth as an evolving system interpreted from the sequence of rocks and fossil remains. Required field trips emphasize local geology and illustrate methods of historical reconstruction.

    (3 hrs lec, 2 hrs lab)
  
  •  

    GEOL 1235 - History and Geology of Yellowstone Area

    (3)
    This course is an intensive, hands-on, mountainsite short course on the geology and history of Yellowstone National Park and surrounding areas and is intended primarily for K-12 teachers.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    GEOL 1546 - Rocks and Minerals

    (1)
    Students acquire a broad understanding of survey of common and economically important rocks and minerals of Northern Wyoming. This course provides an overview of the rock cycle and plate tectonics. For the non-geologist. Optional Saturday field trip. 

    (1 hr lec)
  
  •  

    GEOL 1547 - Heart Mountain, Volcanoes, and the Rockies

    (1)
    Students will acquire a broad understanding of mountain building, volcanism, and plate tectonics. Examples focus on the geology of the Wyoming Rockies; the origin of Heart Mountain and Absaroka volcanism; and the Yellowstone hot spot. For the non-geologist. Optional Saturday field trip.

    (1 hr lec)
  
  •  

    GEOL 1548 - Shallow Seas and Changing Climate

    (1)
    Students acquire a broad understanding of survey of Wyoming focusing on rock and fossil evidence for how Wyoming’s landscape, geography, and climate have changed through time from early Earth history to the present. For the non-geologist. Optional Saturday field trip.

    (1 hr lec)
  
  •  

    GEOL 2000 - Geochemical Cycles and the Earth System

    (4)
    Introduces the Earth system, including the solid Earth, rock associations and geochemical cycles.Completion of GEOL 1100  recommended.

    (3 hrs lec, 2hrs lab)
  
  •  

    GEOL 2150 - Geomorphology

    (4)
    Geomorphology is a broad survey of landforms and the processes that modify them, encompassing space and time scales ranging from the instantaneous motion of sand in rivers dureing floods to the uplift of mountains anges over millions of years. Studied in depth are the processes, effects, and results of streams, rivers, landslides, weathering, glaciers, deserts, shorlines, oceans, and volcanism. Students will develop critical thinking abilities and problem solving skills in weekly labs. 

    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
    (3 hrs lec, 1 hr lab)
  
  •  

    GEOL 2325 - Dinosaurs of Wyoming

    (2)
    Designed to familiarize students with dinosaurs that once inhabited Wyoming and other western states. Explores the paleontological research in and near Wyoming, dinosaur taxonomy, the Mesozoic environment, theories concerning lifestyles and extinction of dinosaurs, and the relationship of dinosaurs to the human race. Field trip required.

    (2 hrs lec)

Health Education

  
  •  

    HLED 1003 - Wellness

    (3)
    Explores the relationship between diet, exercise, and health in a lecture/lab format. A trans disciplinary approach emphasizing the integration of concepts and processes relevant to the pursuit of optimal well-being.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HLED 1006 - Personal Health

    (3)
    Presents in logical form a body of knowledge from biological and social sciences essential for sound decisions in health maintenance and a proper sense of health values.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HLED 1221 - Standard First Aid and CPR

    (2)
    This certification course prepares students to cope when emergency care is needed and meets the requirements of employers. Students study the fundamental principles, knowledge, and skills of accident prevention, examination procedures and first aid care for victims of accidents or sudden illness before medical assistance is available. Current American Heart Association materials are used for First Aid, and adult, child and infant AED, and CPR training. Upon successful completion of the course, students will receive an American Heart Association Health Care Provider CPR (BLS) certification card and American Heart Association Heart Saver First Aid certification card.

    (2 hr lec)
  
  •  

    HLED 1222 - Wilderness First Aid

    (2)
    Students are prepared to cope with emergencies in wilderness and/or remote settings where the rescuer will be with the patient for extended periods of time. Current American Red Cross and Wilderness Medicine Institute guidelines will be followed. Upon successful completion of the course, students will receive certification through the American Red Cross.

    (1.5 hrs lec/ 1 hr lab)
  
  •  

    HLED 1271 - Diet and Exercise

    (2)
    Introduces an understanding of basic nutrition and exercise facts relating to weight loss and fitness. Encourages development and use of a total physical fitness program.

    (2 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HLED 2006 - Health for Elementary Educators

    (1)
    Students are acquainted with the Wyoming Health Standards and Benchmarks, techniques/ instruments for assessing the Wyoming Health Standards and Benchmarks, sample health curriculum models/approaches for elementary school K-6, developing lesson plans in health education for elementary learners, and integrating health into language arts programs.

    (1 hr lec)
  
  •  

    HLED 2010 - Wilderness First Responder

    (3)
    This course is designed to provide outdoor leaders, instructors, guides, rangers, and wilderness and foreign travelers with the knowledge needed to deal with emergencies in remote settings. The curriculum covers standards of care for urban situations with additional protocols for remote situations. Special topics include but are not limited to CPR considerations (when not to start and when to stop), wilderness wound and burn management, clearing patients of spine and head trauma, athletic injuries, realigning fractures and dislocations, improvised splinting techniques, patient monitoring and long-term management problems, up-to-date information on all environmental emergencies, common simple medical problems, plus advice on drug therapies. Emphasis is placed on prevention and decision-making. Certifications up successful completion include Wilderness First Responder and Adult CPR and Airway Management.

    (2.5 hrs lec, 1 hr lab)

Health Science

  
  •  

    HLSC 1010 - Introduction to Allied Health Professions

    (3)
    Students acquire an overview of Allied Health Professions and are provided information relating to health maintenance and the identification, evaluation, prevention, and treatment of diseases or conditions. An in-depth review of careers in nursing, radiography, laboratory, respiratory, nutrition, and Health Systems Management is provided to identify the expectations of inter-professional alliances. This course is only offered during the Fall semester and is a required pre-requisite for enrollment in HLSC 2030 Applied Health Care Concepts.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HLTK 1200 - Medical Terminology

    (3)
    This course introduces the student to the terminology and vocabulary used in medical professions, including the use of work roots, prefixes, suffixes, and combining forms. The content of this course will provide the student with the skills to better understand and utilize terms associating disease, diagnostics, treatments, and procedures.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HLSC 2030 - Applied Allied Health Concepts

    (3)
    Students learn professional standards that apply to all health care workers in the general Allied Health field and their role in that environment. Topics include the key elements of professionalism, health care industry standards, work ethic and performance, personal traits of healthcare professionals, communication skills, cultural competence, and preparing for employment and professional development. This course is only offered in the Spring semester.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of HLSC 1010   with a D- or better.
    (2 hrs lec)

History

  
  •  

    HIST 1110 - Western Civilization I

    (3)
    A survey of Western Civilization from Imperial Rome through the Byzantine, Islamic, and Medieval civilizations, to the Renaissance, Reformation, and Early Modern period of the Euro-Mediterranean world around 1700.

    Prerequisite: Must be eligible to take   or consent of instructor.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 1120 - Western Civilization II

    (3)
    A historical survey of Western Civilization from the Early Modern era in the Euro-Mediterranean region through the 20th Century, including the onset of colonialism, the rise of global empires, the emergence of the modern political and social ideologies, the impact of industrial and technological transformation, the role of Europe’s “outposts” such as the United States, Canada, and other former imperial possessions, as well as the major events of European significance like the French Revolution, revolutionary movements of the 19th century, the world wars, and the Cold War. Features strong emphasis on the intellectual, cultural or spiritual currents of all the peoples involved. 

    Prerequisite: Must be eligible to take   or consent of instructor.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 1211 - US History to 1865

    (3)
    This course is an introductory survey of American history from the age of discovery to approximately the time of the Civil War. We will explore the social, economic, and political developments that have helped to determine long-term historical and cultural patterns for the American people.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 1221 - The United States from 1865

    (3)
    Surveys American history from approximately the time of the Civil War to the present. Emphasis on the development of constitutional, socio-political, cultural, and economic factors that explain the emergence of the United States as a global power. Meets statutory requirements for instruction in principles and provisions of the constitutions of the United States and Wyoming.

    Prerequisite: Must be eligible to take   or consent of instructor.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 1229 - History of Yellowstone

    (3)
    Course examines the historical development of Yellowstone National Park from prehistoric times to the present. Students learn how Yellowstone’s historical development paved the way towards the current issues it faces today. Students explore what makes Yellowstone unique as a national park and as an ecosystem. Examines how various people expressed their feelings towards Yellowstone through art, photography, and literature.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 1235 - History and Geology of the Yellowstone Area

    (3)
    This course is an intensive, hands-on, mountainsite short course on the geology and history of Yellowstone National Park and surrounding areas and is intended primarily for K-12 teachers.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 1251 - Wyoming History

    (3)
    A survey which encourages an understanding of Wyoming history, how it relates to the history of the West and the rest of America and how it has influenced the present. An important component is to learn about the U.S. and the Wyoming constitutions and how these two documents have influenced Wyoming history. 

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 1280 - History of Montana

    (3)
    A survey of Montana history. Covers the development of the territory and state and examines the social, economic, cultural, and political patterns in its relations to the nation.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 1290 - History of U.S. West

    (3)
    A history of the changing frontier in the United States, its native peoples, and the westward movement of Americans from colonial times to the 20th century. Special focus on the trans-Mississippi west, the role of physical geography, and the interaction of various cultures.

    Prerequisite: Must be eligible to take   or consent of instructor.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 2039 - History of East Asia

    (3)
    This course is an introductory survey of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean culture, society, and politics. We will discuss both common characteristics as well as the differences between these countries. The course emphasizes three main themes: cultural exchange in East Asia prior to the 19th century, the impact of 19th century foreign imperialism, and the rise of East Asia as a key player in 20th century world economics and politics.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 2050 - Introduction to Public History

    (3)
    Introduces the student to the non-teaching, professional uses of history. Topics for consideration include archival preservation, museum management, public information, publications, historic site development, oral history, and historical programming.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 2080 - Holocaust

    (3)
    Examines the Nazi campaign to persecute and exterminate European Jews. Includes the broader dimensions of Nazi racial policies aimed at gypsies, Slavs, the disabled, and other groups. Explores the complicity of nations and governments throughout the world, as well as the verdicts at Nuremberg. Seeks to apply the lessons of the Holocaust to current discussions of intolerance, racism, and genocide. 

    Prerequisite: Must be eligible to take   or consent of instructor.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 2112 - Revolutionary Europe

    (3)
    Students analyze the major revolutionary movements and upheavals from the French Revolution of 1789 through the Russian, German, and Austrian Revolutions of 1917-19.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010  with a “C” or better.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 2115 - 20th Century Europe

    (3)
    Social, economic, political, and intellectual history of Europe from the First World War to Gorbachev and the Soviet collapse, including the relationship of developments to physical, political, and cultural geography.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010  with a “C” or better.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 2120 - Ancient Greece

    (3)
    Study begins with prehistoric times, traces the rise of the Greeks, the Dark Ages, the Age of Expansion, the Classical Period, the Hellenistic Age, and the arrival of the Romans. Topics include language, literature, religion and mythology, athletics, warfare, law and democracy, theatre, education, science, philosophy, and political history. 

    Prerequisite: English level 3 or consent of Instructor.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 2125 - Ancient Civilizations

    (3)
    A survey of Old World Civilizations that examines the Ancient Near East, Greece, and Republican Rome as a basis for comparative analysis of Ancient China and India, featuring a strong emphasis on the intellectual, cultural, religious, socio-economic, and political history of the peoples involved.

    Prerequisite: Must be eligible to take   or consent of instructor.
    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 2130 - Ancient Rome

    (3)
    Students examine the Rise of the Roman State, the character of Roman culture and social development, as well as the impact of Roman imperialism on the Euro-Mediterranean World. Students also analyze the Roman decline and the extension of Rome’s legacy into the Byzantine Era.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 2290 - North American Indians

    (3)
    Presents the history of North American Indians starting with the pre-Columbian era and tracing developments through the Colonial Period, the revolutionary independence struggles, and the problems of native people under national regimes through the 19th and 20th centuries. Special emphasis on the experiences of Indians in the United States and Canada, including cultures of the eastern woodlands, plains, Rocky Mountain and Pacific areas, and the Arctic. 

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 2310 - American Women’s History

    (3)
    This course examines the relation between gender dynamics - particularly as they involve the distribution of power - and major social, cultural, and political developments in United States history.  It’s fundamental assumptions are 1) that gender is a useful category of historical analysis; 2) that since gender dynamics relate so closely to the distribution of political, social, and economic power in American society, they are central to U.S. history; 3) that experiences and constructions of masculinity and femininity are necessarily interrelated; and 4) that those experiences and constructions have varied across lines of race and class.  Major area in which gender has been constructed, and which will be the foci of this course, include work, economics, family, sexuality, and politics.

  
  •  

    HIST 2389 - History of Women and the American West

    (3)
    The purpose of this course is to provide students with a detailed understaniding of life in the North American West from the perspective of women. This course will challenge traditional histories of the West that exclude women. In doing so, this course intends to illuminate the important contributions that women have made in shaping the history of the North American West. The objective of this coursee is to provide student with a detailed understaning of the political, social, and economic conditions of the West. We will identify the major historical themes of the history of the North AMerican West, noting patterns of changes over time. 

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 2471 - Internship: History

    (1-6)
    Available to the serious student who desires to observe and participate in a demanding and rewarding professional off-campus experience. Prerequisite: Permission of the on-campus instructor.

    (1-6 hrs lec per credit hour)
  
  •  

    HIST 2914 - The First World War

    (3)
    Analyzes the causes, course, and consequences of the First World War on from a global perpective, including the political, military, economic, social, intellectual and psychological dimensions involving the belligerent states as well as the peoples of their formal and informal empires on all the affected continents, with specific concluding evaluation of its effets on future generations to the present day.

    (3hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HIST 2939 - The Second World War

    (3)
    Analyzes the causes, course, and consequences of the Second World War on from a global perspective, including the political, military, economic, social, intellectual, ideological and psychological dimensions involving the belligerent states as well as the peoples of their formal and informal empires on all the affected continents, with specific concluding evaluation of its effects on future generations to the present day.

    (3 hrs lec)

Horticulture

  
  •  

    HORT 1100 - Introduction to Horticulture

    (3)
    Exposes the student to the far-reaching aspects of horticulture and provides a working knowledge of the basic principles of horticultural practices.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HORT 1600 - Special Applications

    (1-3)
    Course addresses a diversity of subjects within the field of horticulture. Areas of emphasis vary and may be selected from topics of interest to practitioners within the field or to new and evolving issues. Utilizes lecture, lab, and seminar format for student instruction. Course may be repeated using different topic titles.

    (1 hr lec, 4 hrs lab for 3 hr course)

Human Development

  
  •  

    HMDV 1101 - General Studies First Year Seminar

    (3)
    This is the official “Cornerstone” course for the General Studies discipline.  It is an orientation class which introduces students to institutional resources, opportunities, and programs that enhance their academic and social success.


Humanities

  
  •  

    HUMN 1101 - Humanities First Year Seminar

    (2)
    Surveys the disciplines of the Humanities regarding content and methodologies. Introduces students to institutional opportunities and programs that enhance their success; degree programs and requirements; and the expectations of “Humanities” with regards to research, writing, and ethical considerations.

    (2 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    INTL 2300 - Study Abroad

    (0)
    The Study Abroad course serves as a placeholder class that allows NWC study abroad students to maintain their NWC student status and gives them access to their financial aid (if applicable), institutional scholarships (if applicable), e-services, the NWC library and their NWC email. Students enrolled in this course will be full-time students aboard, taking accredited courses through another U.S. institution that is administering a study abroad program in partnership with a foreign institution.

  
  •  

    HUMN 2445 - American Culture & Values

    (3)
    This course provides international students with an introduction to American culture and values. This course is designed to increase intercultural understanding and promote cultural adjustment. Topics covered include communication styles, social customs, historical events, politics, religion, diversity, healthcare, education, etc. Students will gain firsthand experience through field trips to museums, schools, and events.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    HUMN 2460 - Humanities Field Studies

    (1-3)
    Course offers students the opportunity to travel to various destinations (i.e., Great Britain, Hawaii, etc.) to explore the cultures of those sites. The on-campus portion of the course focuses on the destination’s history, culture, and travel peculiarities.

    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
    (1 hr lec, 4 hrs lab)

Information Management

  
  •  

    IMGT 2400 - Intro to Information Management

    (3)
    Concerned with the role of information systems in managing organizations to make them more competitive and efficient. Specific topics include organizational and technical foundation of information systems and building and managing systems.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of 30 credit hours.
    (3 hrs lec)

Instructional Technology

  
  •  

    ITEC 2360 - Teaching With Technology

    (3)
    Students are introduced to effective utilization of computers and other instructional technologies for instruction, software/hardware selection, and integrated, professional, and instructional applications as applied to all areas and levels of P-12 education.

    (3 hrs lec)

Japanese

  
  •  

    JAPN 1010 - First Year Japanese I

    (4)
    Students learn the fundamentals of the Japanese language with focus on the development of the four basic language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Along with a variety of communicative activities for speaking and listening, students learn hiragana, katakana, and approximately 60 kanji (Chinese characters) for reading and writing. Intended for students who have minimal proficiency or no previous Japanese language experience.

    (4 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    JAPN 1020 - First Year Japanese II

    (4)
    Continuation of JAPN 1010 employing an interactive method.

    Prerequisite: One year of high school Japanese or completion of   with a “C-” or better.
    (4 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    JAPN 2030 - Second Year Japanese I

    (4)
    Students continue fundamentals of the Japanese language with focus on the development of the four basic language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Along with a variety of communicative activities for speaking and listening, students review hiragana, katakana, and learn approximately 70 kanji (Chinese characters) for reading and writing. 

    Prerequisite: Completion of   with a “C-” or better or consent of instructor.
    (4 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    JAPN 2040 - Second Year Japanese II

    4
    Students continue fundamentals of the Japanese language with focus on the development of the four basic language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Along with a variety of communicative activities for speaking and listening, students review hiragana, katakana, and learn approximately 70 kanji (Chinese characters) for reading and writing.

    Prerequisite: Completion of   with a “C-” or better or consent of instructor.
    (4 hrs lec)

Management

  
  •  

    MGT 1000 - Introduction to Supervision

    (3)
    Students acquire knowledge and skills used in supervision, organization, time management, decision-making, and information management. Students work with practical applications that reinforce the theory. Through comprehensive cases and illustrations, students examine the interrelationship of key supervisory management principles.

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    MGT 2100 - Principles of Management

    (3)
    Covers objectives, planning, organization of resources, human relations, coping with change and conflict, and controlling as management responsibilities. Includes appropriate behavioral and management science applications to the management process. </p

    (3 hrs lec)
  
  •  

    MGT 2470 - Internship: Management

    (1-6)
    Students acquire management experience through internships with businesses in the Big Horn Basin. Students receive guidance from college and internship-site supervisors plus receive a structured assessment of their work performance. Designed for students in the last semester of the management program.

    Prerequisites: Recommended enrollment in MGT 2100 or MKT 2100  and successful completion of at least 30 credit hours.
    (1 hr lec, 6 hrs lab)
 

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